Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

The Ford company logo is displayed above the Chicago Assembly Plant on Feb. 3. Ford is allowing many workers to work remotely — not just during the pandemic, but as routine policy. But of course, plant workers can't sign in to work from home. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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A Remote Work Revolution Is Underway — But Not For Everyone

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Big Oil Is Seeing Big Earnings Again

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The new iMac computers are unveiled on April 20 via this illustration at a virtual event in La Habra, Calif. Apple said it could suffer a hit to its revenue as a shortage of chips could affect the production of iPads and Macs. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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The Tesla logo is seen at its store in New York on March 24. The automaker posted record earnings on Monday, thanks in part to a profit from its sale of Bitcoin. (Photo by John Smith/VIEWpress) VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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VIEW press/Corbis via Getty Images

Cars make their way toward downtown Los Angeles on Thursday. California could regain the right to set its own vehicle emissions standards after the Environmental Protection Agency announced it was moving to curb a Trump-era policy that sought to erode the state's previously held power. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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White House Is Preparing To Give Back California's Smog-Busting Powers

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A Honda SUV E prototype is displayed during the 19th Shanghai International Automobile Industry Exhibition in Shanghai on April 20. Honda says battery-powered SUVs will be a key part of its plan to sell exclusively zero-emissions vehicles by 2040. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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A gas pump nozzle is seen at a Miami gas station in 2018. Some activist shareholders are pushing companies to tie executive compensation to meeting climate targets. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Some CEOs Are Hearing A New Message: Act On Climate, Or We'll Cut Your Pay

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Fears are rising about whether supplies of batteries can keep up with the expected surge in the production of electric vehicles. Pictured here is a close-up of individual battery cells contained in a battery pack module for a Lucid Motors electric vehicle. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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As Auto Industry Goes Electric, Can It Avoid A Battery Bottleneck?

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Auto Industry Continues To Struggle With Supply Chain Issues

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A sign is seen outside of a General Motors plant in Detroit, on Jan. 27, 2020. GM said on Thursday it is idling more plants as it continues to deal with a shortage of chips. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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If World's Battery Supply Doesn't Scale Up, Automakers Will Be In Trouble

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Saudi Energy Minister Abdulaziz bin Salman speaks at an investment conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Jan. 27. OPEC and its allies on Thursday decided to gradually boost oil production in anticipation of a rebound in crude demand over the summer. Fayez Nureldine/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Biden's Infrastructure Plan Would Push For Electric Vehicles

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What A Shocker — 'Voltswagen' Sparks Scorn With Stunt That Duped So Many, It Hertz

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