Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Story Archive

The driver of an electric car handles the charging cable to charge the car at a public charging station in Berlin, Germany. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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2022 is promising to be big year for electric vehicles

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Energy got a lot more expensive in 2021

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Car keys are shown by glasses with alcohol in this stock photo illustration. Companies are developing technology that would allow cars to stop people from driving when drunk. Peter Dazeley/Getty Images hide caption

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What if cars could stop you from driving drunk? A peek at the latest tech

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Tesla reported 475,318 vehicles — 356,309 Model 3 and 119,009 Model S — are subject to the recalls, according to documents filed with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

For the auto industry, 2022 will pick up where 2021's problems left off

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Companies are working on technology to get cars to detect and prevent drunk driving

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A Waymo minivan moves along a city street during an autonomous vehicle ride on April 7 in Chandler, Ariz. Waymo, a unit of Google parent Alphabet Inc., is one of several companies testing driverless vehicles in the U.S. Automakers are also developing self-driving technology, but it still requires human drivers to take over when required. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Cars are getting better at driving themselves, but you still can't sit back and nap

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Latest coronavirus variant has put oil producing countries in a tough spot

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The Lucid Air takes the stage at the 2021 LA Autoshow on November 17, 2021. The luxury electric sedan won the 2022 Motortrend Car of the Year award this month. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Every auto startup wants to be the next Tesla. Why these 2 may have a real shot

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2 little-known automotive startups are leading the race to become the next Tesla

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A customer prepares to pump gas into her car at a Shell station on Wednesday in San Rafael, Calif. A surge in gas prices this year is leaving the Biden administration looking for options to do something about it. One that's getting recent attention is tapping the country's emergency oil stockpile. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Motorists fill up their vehicles at a Shell station on July 22 in Denver. Phasing out the sale of gas-powered cars once seemed laughable. It's now inching closer to reality. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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David Zalubowski/AP

Giving up gas-powered cars was a fringe idea. It's now on its way to reality

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Sea levels in Guyana are rising several times faster than the global average. High tides sometimes spill over the seawall that is meant to protect the coastline. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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Two Sides Of Guyana: A Green Champion And An Oil Producer

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The age of gas cars could be ending

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