Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
Stories By

Camila Domonoske

Brandon Carter/NPR
Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

Story Archive

Vehicles sit in a nearly empty lot at a car dealership in Richmond, Calif., on July 1. The global semiconductor shortage has hobbled auto production worldwide, making it difficult to find a car to buy. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

In December 1955, a man posts a price for leaded gasoline at a station in Everett, Massachusetts. The United Nations said on Monday that the world is no longer using the toxic fuel, bringing an end to a century of damaging pollution. Anonymous/Associated Press hide caption

toggle caption
Anonymous/Associated Press

The World Has Finally Stopped Using Leaded Gasoline. Algeria Used The Last Stockpile

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1031429212/1032555116" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Out of order notes are left on gas pumps to warn motorists of outages Hollywood, Calif. on May 12, 2021, immediately after the Colonial Pipeline shutdown. Two of its lines were temporarily shut down ahead of Hurricane Ida this weekend. Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Chandan Khanna/AFP via Getty Images

A driver exits the yard after filling up his gas tanker truck at Marathon Oil on May 20 in Salt Lake City. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
George Frey/Getty Images

Tight Supply Of Truckers Leaves A Few Gas Stations Dry

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1028108776/1028712144" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

New Fuel Regulations Will Help The Transition To Electric Vehicles

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1025248642/1025248643" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

President Biden gets out of a Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 4xE after delivering remarks at the White House Thursday on electric vehicles and new fuel economy and emissions standards. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

There's A Big Push For Electric Cars, With The White House Teaming Up With Automakers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1024840934/1025018901" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Delta Variant Forces U.S. Automakers To Revisit Mask Mandates

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1024566774/1024566775" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Major automakers like Jaguar develop all-electric race cars to compete in Formula E. Here Mitch Evans, in a Jaguar, leads rivals during the ABB FIA Formula E Championship in New York City on July 11. Handout/Jaguar Racing via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Handout/Jaguar Racing via Getty Images

With A Whirr, Not A Roar, Auto Racing Drives Toward An Electric Future

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1015650142/1018226203" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

European Officials Unveil A Sweeping Plan To Tackle Climate Change

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1016300678/1016300679" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gas prices are displayed at a Chevron station on June 14 in Los Angeles. A meeting of the oil cartel known as OPEC+ ended in drama, leading to intense volatility in crude prices. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Oil Prices Are In Turmoil Right Now. Here Are 5 Things You Need To Know

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1013721716/1013967813" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

When Oil Companies Say They're Going Green, Should We Believe Them?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1013645625/1013645626" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Arguments And Changes In Demand Are Driving The Recent Yo-Yoing Of Gas Prices

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1013496154/1013496155" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript