Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.
Brandon Carter/NPR
Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

Syrian state media said Tuesday that inspectors with the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons had entered the town of Douma. A day later, the OPCW said that hadn't happened. Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Louai Beshara/AFP/Getty Images

Protesters demonstrate outside a Starbucks in Philadelphia on Sunday, several days after police arrested two black men who were waiting inside the Center City coffee shop. The chain has announced it will close for an afternoon on May 29 for companywide racial-bias training. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

A statue of surgeon J. Marion Sims is taken down from its pedestal in Central Park on Tuesday. A New York City panel decided to move the controversial statue after outcry, because many of Sims' medical breakthroughs came from experimenting on enslaved black women without anesthesia. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The IRS has extended the filing deadline because of technical problems. Taxpayers now have until midnight Wednesday to file their returns or extension requests and pay their taxes. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

Syrian authorities distribute bread, vegetables and pasta to residents on Monday in the town of Douma, the site of a suspected chemical weapons attack, near Damascus, Syria. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Tenth-century silver items are pictured on a table in Schaprode, northern Germany, on Friday. A 13-year-old boy and a hobby archaeologist have unearthed a "significant" trove in Germany which may have belonged to the legendary Danish King Harald Bluetooth. Stefan Sauer /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Sauer /AFP/Getty Images

Martin Sorrell, the longtime CEO of WPP, attends a summit in June 2016, in London. He has stepped down after an investigation into alleged misconduct. Neil Hall/WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Former first lady Barbara Bush looks on before game five of the 2017 World Series between the Houston Astros and the Los Angeles Dodgers at Minute Maid Park on Oct. 29, 2017, in Houston. David J. Phillip/Getty Images hide caption

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Facebook co-founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg prepares to testify before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. This is the second day of testimony before Congress by Zuckerberg, 33. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before a joint hearing of the U.S. Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee and Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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