Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

A gas pump nozzle is seen at a Miami gas station in 2018. Some activist shareholders are pushing companies to tie executive compensation to meeting climate targets. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Some CEOs Are Hearing A New Message: Act On Climate, Or We'll Cut Your Pay

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Fears are rising about whether supplies of batteries can keep up with the expected surge in the production of electric vehicles. Pictured here is a close-up of individual battery cells contained in a battery pack module for a Lucid Motors electric vehicle. Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick T. Fallon/AFP via Getty Images

As Auto Industry Goes Electric, Can It Avoid A Battery Bottleneck?

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Auto Industry Continues To Struggle With Supply Chain Issues

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A sign is seen outside of a General Motors plant in Detroit, on Jan. 27, 2020. GM said on Thursday it is idling more plants as it continues to deal with a shortage of chips. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

If World's Battery Supply Doesn't Scale Up, Automakers Will Be In Trouble

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Saudi Energy Minister Abdulaziz bin Salman speaks at an investment conference in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Jan. 27. OPEC and its allies on Thursday decided to gradually boost oil production in anticipation of a rebound in crude demand over the summer. Fayez Nureldine/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fayez Nureldine/AFP via Getty Images

Biden's Infrastructure Plan Would Push For Electric Vehicles

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What A Shocker — 'Voltswagen' Sparks Scorn With Stunt That Duped So Many, It Hertz

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A new Volkswagen ID.4 SUV electric vehicle is seen at a customer centre in Wolfsburg, Germany, on March 26. Volkswagen said on Tuesday it is changing its name in the United States to Voltswagen to reflect its electric vehicle ambitions, but some media reports noted it was intended as a prank. Ronny Hartmann/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ronny Hartmann/AFP via Getty Images

The Suez Canal Was Blocked For Under A Week — Here's How That Will Affect The World

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The container ship Ever Given was refloated, unblocking the Suez Canal in Egypt on Monday. Among the objects that were blocked by the ship were livestock, French oak and Ikea furniture. Mahmoud Khaled/Getty Images hide caption

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Why Gas Prices Have Increased In The Last 3 Months

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Lordstown Motors, unveils their new electric pickup truck Endurance in Lordstown, Ohio, on Oct. 15, 2020. The company has been accused of making fraudulent claims by a short seller, but the auto maker denies the accusations. Megan Jelinger/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Megan Jelinger/AFP via Getty Images

Boom Or Bubble? Skeptics Take Aim At Buzzy Electric Vehicle Market

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Last summer, Lucy Le was killed on a street near her Virginia home by a neighbor backing out of her driveway. Her daughter, Laura Pho, now draws a new memorial to her mother every day on the pavement where she died. "It's my meditation," she says. "It's my way of honoring her." Courtesy of Laura Pho hide caption

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Courtesy of Laura Pho

Roads Are Getting Deadlier For Pedestrians; Fatality Rates Are Worse For Minorities

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Pedestrians Are At A Higher Risk Of Being Hit By A Car During The Pandemic

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