Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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AJ Mast/General Motors

A ventilator is pictured during a training in Hamburg, Germany, on March 25. The medical devices can be life-saving for patients with severe COVID-19 cases, but there aren't enough to meet the expected need in the United States. Axel Heimken/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Axel Heimken/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

General Motors has already started working with a ventilator company, Ventec Life Systems, to help it expand production of the essential medical equipment. Now it might start building the devices itself. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump says he's not using his authority to control production and distribution of medical supplies. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Nonperishable goods, paper products and soap have been flying off shelves at American stores. Snacks and produce are selling more, too. Sunscreen? Not so much. Maxwell Posner/NPR hide caption

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Maxwell Posner/NPR

Pump jacks draw crude oil from the Long Beach Oil Field near homes in Signal Hill, Calif., on March 9. The world's crude oil supply is rising even as demand is cratering. David McNew/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/AFP via Getty Images

Vehicles go through the assembly line at a General Motors assembly plant in Lansing, Mich., on Feb. 21. GM is assessing the feasibility of converting its plants to make medical equipment. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

A person shops in front of the empty shelves in the deli section of a Walmart Supercenter in Nashville on Saturday. Jason Kempin/Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Kempin/Getty Images

Empty Grocery Shelves Are Alarming, But They're Not Permanent

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