Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.
Brandon Carter/NPR
Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers breaking news for NPR, primarily writing for the Two-Way blog.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila has appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She's a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime." She also co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

FCC Chastises Cellphone Carriers Slow To Restore Service In Florida

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Destroyed homes and debris are seen near Port St. Joe, Fla., on Friday, two days after Hurricane Michael hit the Florida panhandle. Analysts estimate the storm has caused billions of dollars of damage. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

Michael Will Cost Insurers Billions, But Won't Overwhelm Industry, Analysts Say

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A mass for a canonization ceremony of Pope Paul VI and the martyred Salvadoran Archbishop Oscar Romero, as well as five other people, was in St Peter's Square at the Vatican, on Sunday. Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Filippo Monteforte/AFP/Getty Images

Facebook says 30 million users were affected by a recent security breach, including 400,000 whose accounts were nearly fully accessed and another 14 million who had broad categories of personal data stolen. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

This June, instructions were posted at an early voting precinct in Bismarck, N.D. In that primary election, tribal IDs that did not show residential addresses were accepted as voter ID. But those same IDs will not be accepted in the general election. James MacPherson/AP hide caption

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James MacPherson/AP

Deadly Limousine Crash In New York Brings Fresh Attention To Safety Regulation Loophole

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Kevin Scott, a South Dakota farmer and secretary of the American Soybean Association, welcomed the deal to replace NAFTA because it preserved the market access established under the previous agreement. Courtesy of Jannell Scott hide caption

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Courtesy of Jannell Scott

From The Front Lines Of NAFTA, More Relief Than Rejoicing

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Facebook does not yet know who carried out the attacks or where they were based. The company knows the attackers attempted to access profile information but not whether they succeeded. Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joel Saget/AFP/Getty Images

A man talks on the phone while he rides a bike in Amsterdam. Legislation proposed in the Netherlands would impose a fine on bicyclists who use a mobile phone while they're on their bikes. FaceMePLS/Flickr hide caption

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FaceMePLS/Flickr

Rachel Mitchell, head of the Special Victims Division of the Maricopa County Attorney's Office, is on leave as she heads to Washington, D.C., to assist the Senate Judiciary Committee with a hearing scheduled for Thursday. Maricopa County Attorney's Office hide caption

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Maricopa County Attorney's Office

Pakistani supporters of ousted Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif carry posters and banners outside the high court building in Islamabad on Wednesday as they celebrate his release from prison. Sharif is appealing the conviction, which followed a major corruption scandal. Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Aamir Qureshi/AFP/Getty Images

An empty pedestal remains where a statue known as Early Days, which depicted a Native American at the feet of a Catholic missionary and Spanish cowboy, used to stand on Fulton Street in San Francisco. The statue was removed early Friday morning. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Firefighters battle a house fire in North Andover, Mass., one of a series of fires and explosions on Thursday thought to have been triggered by a gas line that feeds several communities north of Boston. Mary Schwalm/AP hide caption

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Mary Schwalm/AP