Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

Trevor Milton, the founder of Nikola, speaks during a presentation in Turin, Italy December 2, 2019. Milton resigned as executive chairman over allegations that he made misleading claims about the company's technology. Milton has denied the accusations. Massimo Pinca/REUTERS hide caption

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Massimo Pinca/REUTERS

A person on a bike rides by a sign in New York City urging people to stay home in May. As the pandemic drags on, some workers are facing tough choices — balancing potential risks of unwittingly spreading the disease against the possibility of losing pay during a quarantine. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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As Pandemic Stretches On, Revealing Possible Exposure Can Be Costly To Workers

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An oil rig towers over houses last week in Nigg, Scotland. Major players in the oil industry expect depressed oil demand and low prices to continue well into next year. Peter Summers/Getty Images hide caption

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Oil Demand Has Collapsed, And It Won't Come Back Any Time Soon

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United Auto Workers members leave the Fiat Chrysler Automobiles Warren Truck Assembly plant after a shift in May in Warren, Mich. Car sales are picking up again, but automakers face a problem: getting enough workers. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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As Auto Industry Roars Back, Worker Shortages Throw Up Roadblocks

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A United Airlines plane sits at the gate at Denver International Airport on July 30. The airline industry has been hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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United Plans 16,000 Furloughs As Airlines Cut Jobs During Pandemic Downturn

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Exxon joined the Dow Jones Industrial Average in 1928, as Standard Oil, one of companies descended from John D. Rockefeller's world-transforming oil monopoly. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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The U.S. Chamber of Commerce did not incorporate its climate commitments into its annual report card on how members of Congress voted, according to an analysis from an environmental think tank. Stefani Reynolds/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Marston slides a MERV 13 air filter into the HVAC system outside Basics Fitness Center in Portland, Maine, on July 21. The gym bought these filters and made other changes to its ventilation, including bringing in more outside air, to help reduce the spread of the coronavirus. Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Brianna Soukup/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

As We Return To Work And School During The Pandemic, Can The Air Inside Be Kept Safe?

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GAO Deems Homeland Security Appointments Not Legitimate

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Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf testifies last week during a hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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A group solicits funds for weapons by asking for bitcoin, according to the Department of Justice. The Trump administration says al-Qaida and affiliated groups have used such donations to fund terrorism. Department of Justice hide caption

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Department of Justice

President Trump speaks during a Oval Office meeting Thursday with representatives of Israel and the United Arab Emirates, announcing an agreement to establish diplomatic ties between the two countries. Doug Mills/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Corn plants are pushed over in a damaged field in Tama, Iowa. Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds said that early estimates indicate that 10 million acres, or nearly a third of the state's cropland, was damaged in a powerful storm. Daniel Acker/Getty Images hide caption

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A crowd watches as a crane removes the Stonewall Jackson Monument in Richmond, Va., on July 1. Dozens of Confederate monuments have come down this summer. Eze Amos/Getty Images hide caption

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