Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
Camila Domonoske square 2017
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

The Danish company Maersk has been shipping goods around the world since the age of steamships. Now it wants to usher in a new era, with carbon neutral transport. David Hecker/Getty Images hide caption

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David Hecker/Getty Images

Giant Shipper Bets Big On Ending Its Carbon Emissions. Will It Pay Off?

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Virgin Galactic's space tourism rocket plane SpaceShipTwo returns after a test flight in California on Dec. 13, 2018. Billionaire Richard Branson is partnering with a group of investors to take his space tourism company public. Gene Blevins/Reuters hide caption

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Gene Blevins/Reuters

Lee Iaccoca, Superstar CEO Of Chrysler, Dies At 94

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Lee Iacocca, pictured in February 1989, died Tuesday at the age of 94. Under his leadership he brought Chrysler back from the brink of bankruptcy. He is also considered the father of the Mustang, which he helped develop during his stint at Ford. Mario Cabrera/AP hide caption

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Mario Cabrera/AP

A Saudi worker adjusts flags of participating countries before a meeting of energy ministers from OPEC and its allies in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, on May 19. OPEC+ countries met again in Vienna on Monday and Tuesday and agreed to formalize their relationship in a "Charter of Cooperation." Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

Journalists interview oil ministers on the sidelines of the 176th meeting of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries conference on Monday in Vienna. Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Klamar/AFP/Getty Images

A Jaguar I-Pace, the first electric vehicle from the premium carmaker, charges during an event in Barcelona, Spain, in May. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Tesla Led The Charge, But More Premium Electric Vehicles Are Arriving

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A photo demonstrates safety features in a Volvo XC40. Many new cars have optional features that can help prevent accidents. But those same features can also make repairs more expensive, boosting car insurance premiums. Volvo Car Group hide caption

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Volvo Car Group

Why Safer Cars Don't Lead To Cheaper Car Insurance ... Yet

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News Brief: Mexico Border Policy, Abortion Poll, Car Emissions Standards

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Automakers Call For One Set Of Emissions Standards

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Morning traffic fills a freeway in Los Angeles. Seventeen automakers signed a letter to the Trump administration and California Gov. Gavin Newsom saying they want one set of policies to reduce greenhouse gases and make cars more fuel efficient. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Carmakers To White House: Work With California On Rules For Greenhouse Gases

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An employee works at a wiring harness and cable assembly manufacturing company in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico, that exports to the U.S. in 2017. The auto industry says threatened tariffs would play havoc with supply chains. Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters hide caption

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Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters

Ohio To Juárez And Back Again: Why Tariffs On Mexico Alarm The Auto Industry

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A Fiat Chrysler Merger With Renault Would Create 3rd Biggest Car Maker

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