Camila Domonoske Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.
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Camila Domonoske

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Camila Domonoske 2017
Brandon Carter/NPR

Camila Domonoske

Reporter

Camila Flamiano Domonoske covers cars, energy and the future of mobility for NPR's Business Desk.

She got her start at NPR with the Arts Desk, where she edited poetry reviews, wrote and produced stories about books and culture, edited four different series of book recommendation essays, and helped conceive and create NPR's first-ever Book Concierge.

With NPR's Digital News team, she edited, produced, and wrote news and feature coverage on everything from the war in Gaza to the world's coldest city. She also curated the NPR home page, ran NPR's social media accounts, and coordinated coverage between the web and the radio. For NPR's Code Switch team, she has written on language, poetry and race. For NPR's Two-Way Blog/News Desk, she covered breaking news on all topics.

As a breaking news reporter, Camila appeared live on-air for Member stations, NPR's national shows, and other radio and TV outlets. She's written for the web about police violence, deportations and immigration court, history and archaeology, global family planning funding, walrus haul-outs, the theology of hell, international approaches to climate change, the shifting symbolism of Pepe the Frog, the mechanics of pooping in space, and cats ... as well as a wide range of other topics.

She was a regular host of NPR's daily update on Facebook Live, "Newstime" and co-created NPR's live headline contest, "Head to Head," with Colin Dwyer.

Every now and again, she still slips some poetry into the news.

Camila graduated from Davidson College in North Carolina.

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Story Archive

Prince Abdulaziz bin Salman, Saudi Arabia's minister of energy, chairs a virtual Group of 20 ministers meeting in April. The Saudi-led OPEC cartel decided to boost production modestly amid considerable uncertainty about the global economy. Saudi Energy Ministry via AP hide caption

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Saudi Energy Ministry via AP

An Exxon station in Hicksville, N.Y., in March. Exxon Mobil Corp. announced up to $20 billion in write-downs of natural gas assets, the biggest such action ever by the company. Bruce Bennett/Getty Images hide caption

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Exxon Writes Off Record Amount From Value of Assets Amid Energy Market Downturn

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Electric Car Chargers: When Supply Drives Demand

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OPEC Meets To Decide Whether Cuts In Oil Production Are Still Needed

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A Tesla car powers up at a charging station in Petaluma, Calif., on Sept. 23. Automakers are trying to convince would-be electric car buyers to adopt new habits to power their vehicles. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Nice Car, But How Do You Charge That Thing? Let Us Count The Ways

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk visits the construction site of a future Tesla plant near Berlin on Sept. 3. Musk is now the world's second-richest person, according to the Bloomberg Billionaires Index. Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images

Joe Biden speaks about climate change and wildfires affecting Western states during a speech in Wilmington, Del., on Sept. 14. Although the president-elect has promised an ambitious agenda to tackle climate change, few expect a death knell for the oil industry. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Why The Oil Industry Doesn't Fear Biden

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Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted that there was "something extremely bogus" going on with his initial coronavirus test results. Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP via Getty Images
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The Case Of The Soaring Car Prices

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President-elect Joe Biden's dog Champ stands during speeches at the vice president's residence in 2012. When the family returns to Washington, Champ will have to show his younger brother, Major, the ropes. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Ford, executive chairman of Ford Motor Co., with the 2021 Ford F-150 King Ranch truck in September in Dearborn, Mich. Strong demand for high-margin vehicles such as pickups has propelled Ford and its rivals to remarkably strong earnings this past quarter. Nic Antaya/Getty Images hide caption

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What Blockbuster Automaker Profits Tell Us About The Pandemic Economy

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Auto Sales Rebound Faster Than Analysts Had Predicted

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