Eyder Peralta Eyder Peralta is an international correspondent for NPR. He was named NPR's Mexico City correspondent in 2022.
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Eyder Peralta

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Eyder Peralta headshot
Courtesy of Eyder Peralta

Eyder Peralta

International Correspondent, Mexico City, Mexico

Eyder Peralta is an international correspondent for NPR. He was named NPR's Mexico City correspondent in 2022. Before that, he was based in Cape Town, South Africa. He started his journalism career as a pop music critic and after a few newspaper stints, he joined NPR in 2008.

In his career, Peralta has reported from more than 20 countries on four continents. In 2022, his coverage of East Africa was named a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in the Audio Reporting category.

Peralta joined NPR as associate producer, working his way up to become an international correspondent in 2016.

While based in Nairobi, Kenya, and then Cape Town, South Africa, he crisscrossed the African continent. He's interviewed presidents, covered resistance movements, civil war, Ebola and the coronavirus pandemic. He spent years reporting a profile on the most vulgar woman in Uganda. He wrote about house music in South Africa, the joy of mango season in Kenya, a baby elephant boom, hyenas and even how he ended up jailed for four days in South Sudan.

On occasion, he was dispatched to other regions, including Venezuela and Ukraine to cover the Russian invasion.

Previously, Peralta reported breaking news for NPR based out of Washington, D.C., where he covered everything from the American rapprochement with Cuba to natural disasters to the national debates on policing and immigration.

In 2009 and 2014, Peralta was part of the NPR teams that received the George Foster Peabody Award. His 2016 investigative feature on the death of Philando Castile was honored by the National Association of Black Journalists and the Society for News Design.

Peralta was born amid a civil war in Matagalpa, Nicaragua. His parents fled when he was child and they settled in Miami. Peralta graduated with a journalism degree from Florida International University.

He is married to writer and author Cynthia Leonor Garza. They have three young daughters, who occasionally do their own reporting.

Story Archive

Mexico's president leads a massive pro-government march

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Mexico pays tribute to Frida, the golden labrador who saved lives

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A woman prays during a mass at the St. Pierre church in the Pétion-Ville district of Port-au-Prince, Haiti, on Oct. 23. Odelyn Joseph for NPR hide caption

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Odelyn Joseph for NPR

Many people living in Haiti are actively resisting international intervention

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Some 19,000 people in Haiti are facing catastrophic levels of hunger

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Haiti is dealing with multiple crises. Is international intervention the answer?

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A day in the life of Haitians in the capital city of Port-au-Prince

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Data leak exposes Mexico military corruption, including collusion with drug cartels

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Cuba is still working to get to its power back up after Hurricane Ian knocked it out

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Protesters in Mexico City demand to know what happened to 43 college students

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Kenya has a new president after a more transparent — but still contentious — election

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Tigrayan rebels accept ceasefire and say they're ready for peace talks

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Supporters of Kenya's president-elect William Ruto hold posters of him as they gather while waiting for results of Kenya's general election in Eldoret, Kenya, on Monday. Simon Maina/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Maina/AFP via Getty Images