Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism, a topic he has covered in the U.S., the Middle East and in many other countries around the world for more than two decades.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism, a topic he has covered in the U.S., the Middle East and in many other countries around the world for more than two decades.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents around the world and national security reporters in Washington. He heads the Parallels blog and is a frequent contributor to the website on global affairs. Prior to his current position, he was a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996 to 1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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Tony Mendez, the former CIA officer who rescued six American diplomats from revolutionary Iran in 1980, died Saturday. He's shown here in 2012 in Washington, D.C., at the premiere of Argo, a film based on his operation in Iran. Cliff Owen/AP hide caption

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Cliff Owen/AP

Tony Mendez, The 'Argo' Spy Who Rescued Americans In Iran, Dies At 78

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American-born news anchor Marzieh Hashemi sits in a studio in Tehran where she works for Iran's state television. She was arrested Sunday during a visit to the U.S., her family says. She is testifying behind closed doors to a grand jury in Washington, D.C., in an unspecified case, a U.S. judge said Friday. Press TV/AP hide caption

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Press TV/AP

A security force member walks outside a shuttered restaurant Thursday in Manbij, Syria, the site of a suicide attack that killed more than a dozen people, including four Americans, a day earlier. The Islamic State claimed responsibility for the attack. Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Delil Souleiman /AFP/Getty Images

Secretary Of State Pompeo Continues His Extensive Mideast Travels

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How The Curious Case Of Paul Whelan Is Unfolding Between The U.S. And Russia

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CIA Director Gina Haspel, speaking at the University of Louisville in September, says she wants to send more undercover officers overseas. Many in the intelligence world says this has become more challenging in an era of universal surveillance. Timothy D. Easley/AP hide caption

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Timothy D. Easley/AP

CIA Chief Pushes For More Spies Abroad; Surveillance Makes That Harder

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What We Know About The American Russia Has Detained On Spying Allegations

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A Justice Department poster shows two Chinese citizens suspected of carrying out an extensive hacking campaign directed at dozens of U.S. tech companies. U.S. law enforcement says such cases are on the rise as China seeks to become a world leader in advanced technologies by 2025. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

In China's Push For High-Tech, Hackers Target Cutting-Edge U.S. Firms

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Rosenstein: 2 Chinese Nationals Indicted On Charges Of Hacking U.S. Targets

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U.S. Gen. Joseph Votel (center), the top U.S. commander for the Middle East, visited a military outpost at al-Tanf in southern Syria, where the U.S. trains Syrian opposition forces, in October. President Trump is planning to withdraw the U.S. forces from Syria, according to a Pentagon official. Lolita Baldor/AP hide caption

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Lolita Baldor/AP

Pompeo Says China Is Responsible For Marriott Computer Hack, Espionage Is Growing

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Yemeni militiamen stand guard at the port in Mukalla, on the southern coast of Yemen. Many factions are involved in Yemen's civil war. The U.S. has supported Saudi Arabia, which has waged a bombing campaign against Houthi rebels. But the U.S. Congress is putting pressure on the Trump administration to end its support of a war that's widely seen as a stalemate and a humanitarian disaster. Jon Gambrell/AP hide caption

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Jon Gambrell/AP

Often Quiet On Wars, Congress Challenges White House Over Yemen

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President Trump's national security adviser Michael Flynn leaves federal courthouse in Washington on July 10. Flynn has pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI and is scheduled to be sentenced later this month. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

The Rise And Fall Of Michael Flynn

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