Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

Story Archive

Friday

What's next with Israel and Iran

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Thursday

Israel is engaged in conflicts on 3 separate fronts: Hamas, Hezbollah and Iran

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Wednesday

Speaker of the House Mike Johnson, R-La., talks with Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, R-Ga., in the House chamber, Thursday, April 11, 2024, at the Capitol in Washington. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Monday

Iran strikes Israel in retaliation for an attack that killed top Iranian officers

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Thursday

Palestinians visit the graves of relatives killed in the war between Israel and Hamas. The cemetery is in the central Gaza town of Deir al-Balah. Wednesday marked the first day of the Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr, but it was a somber day throughout Gaza. Abdel Kareem Hana/AP hide caption

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Abdel Kareem Hana/AP

With little fanfare, Gaza war enters a new stage, from high to low intensity

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Wednesday

How the Gaza war is evolving: Fighting has gone down

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Saturday

A young Palestinian sits on the rubble of a destroyed home following an Israeli military strike on the Rafah refugee camp, in the southern of Gaza Strip, on Oct. 15. Sunday marks six months since the start of the war between Israel and Hamas. Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images

How 6 months of Israel's war in Gaza have upended the Middle East

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Thursday

A closer look at U.S. military support for Israel

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Tuesday

Israeli troops round up Egyptian soldiers captured during fighting in 1956 in the Rafah area of the Gaza Strip, which was controlled by Egypt at the time. Israel, Britain and France invaded Egyptian territory after Egypt moved to nationalize the Suez Canal. But U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower intervened, leading to the withdrawal of foreign troops, including the Israeli forces in Gaza. AP hide caption

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AP

This isn't the first time the U.S. and Israel have disagreed over Gaza

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Workers with World Central Kitchen are reported killed in airstrike in Gaza

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The U.S. and Israel disagree over what should come next in Gaza

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Monday

Attorney General Merrick Garland speaks with reporters during a news conference at the Department of Justice, Wednesday, Dec. 6, 2023, in Washington, as FBI Director Christopher Wray, right, looks on. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Wednesday

This combination photo shows President Joe Biden, left, on March 8, 2024, in Wallingford, Pa., and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Tel Aviv, Israel, Oct. 28, 2023. AP hide caption

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AP

Bibi & Biden: Bromance Or Bust?

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Tuesday

Putin's leadership challenges are starting to mount up

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Wednesday

U.S. President Bill Clinton presides over the 1993 peace accords signed at the White House by Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin (left) and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat. The aim was a negotiated deal ending decades of conflict between the two sides. But no agreement was reached. Today there's talk about recognizing a Palestinian state first and then negotiating the details afterward. Ron Edmonds/AP hide caption

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Ron Edmonds/AP

A radical Mideast proposal: What if the U.S. recognized a Palestinian state now?

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Tuesday

Signs of growing friction between U.S. President Biden and Israel's Netanyahu

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Thursday

In this image grab from an AFPTV video, people carry food parcels that were airdropped March 2 from U.S. aircraft above a beach in the Gaza Strip. President Biden is set to announce the setting up of another avenue for aid to Gaza. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Monday

This Feb. 18 satellite photo shows displaced Palestinians crammed into southern Gaza on the right. Israel is threatening to attack the border town of Rafah, where more than 1 million Palestinians are now living. On the left is the vast, empty expanse of Egypt's Sinai Peninsula. Egypt says it won't allow Palestinians into Egypt because it fears they might not be allowed back into Gaza. Planet Labs PBC hide caption

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Planet Labs PBC

Why Egypt won't allow vulnerable Palestinians across its border

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Thursday

President Joe Biden is greeted by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu after arriving at Ben Gurion International Airport, Oct. 18, 2023, in Tel Aviv. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

A crisis is underway as the Egyptian border is flooded with fleeing Palestinian refugees

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Suheir Barghouti's son, Saleh Barghouti, was shot dead by the Israeli military in 2018 in the West Bank city of Ramallah. Six years later, she still doesn't know where his body is. Ayman Oghanna for NPR hide caption

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Ayman Oghanna for NPR

How the dead serve as bargaining chips in the Israel-Hamas conflict

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