Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism, a topic he has covered in the U.S., the Middle East and in many other countries around the world for more than two decades.
Barry Morgenstein/NPR
Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism, a topic he has covered in the U.S., the Middle East and in many other countries around the world for more than two decades.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents around the world and national security reporters in Washington. He heads the Parallels blog and is a frequent contributor to the website on global affairs. Prior to his current position, he was a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996 to 1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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Story Archive

Two members of the New York City Fire Department look through the open ceiling of the Oculus, part of the World Trade Center transportation hub in New York on Tuesday. The transit hall ceiling window was opened just before 10:28 a.m., marking the moment that the North Tower of the World Trade Center collapsed on Sept. 11, 2001. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

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Craig Ruttle/AP

Report: Counterterrorism Should Pivot To Strengthen Fragile States

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The President's Daily Briefing is the top-secret intelligence report the CIA presents to the president every weekday. The book shown here is for a briefing delivered to President George W. Bush in 2002. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Sept. 11 Revealed The Importance And Limits Of The President's Daily Briefing

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New Judge Takes Over Proceedings For Operatives Accused Of Planning Sept. 11 Attacks

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John Brennan is shown speaking here at the Richard Nixon Presidential Library in Yorba Linda, Calif., in 2016, when he was serving as CIA director. Brennan says he is considering a legal challenge to President Trump's decision to revoke his security clearance. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP

White House Revokes Security Clearance Of Former CIA Director John Brennan

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Tania Joya walks on the beach in Egypt in 2012. When her American husband John Georgelas joined the Islamic State in Syria in 2013, she fled with their children and returned to Texas, where she has built a new life. Courtesy of Tania Joya hide caption

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Courtesy of Tania Joya

To Syria And Back: How 2 Women Escaped Their Radicalized Husbands

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What The Government Is Doing To Stop Foreign Interference In U.S. Elections

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What Is The GRU And What Role Does It Play In Russia's Cyber And Military Operations?

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In 1994 Nelson Mandela revisited the cell at Robben Island prison where he was jailed for more than two decades. Louise Gubb/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Louise Gubb/Corbis via Getty Images

Nelson Mandela's Prison Letters: 'One Day I Will Be Back At Home'

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President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin shake hands at their summit in Helsinki, Finland, on Monday. Trump upset many in the U.S. intelligence community by refusing to endorse their finding that Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election. Putin said he favored Trump in the election, but did not indicate whether he did anything to help him. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

President Bill Clinton (left) and Russian President Boris Yeltsin overlook the fall splendor of the Hudson Valley from the grounds of Franklin Roosevelt's home in Hyde Park, N.Y., on Oct. 23, 1995. The pair had a close relationship throughout the 1990s, befitting a time of reduced tensions just after the Cold War had ended. Stephan Savoia/AP hide caption

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Stephan Savoia/AP

U.S.-Russia Summits, From Gravely Serious To Absurdly Comical

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Doubts Mount Over North Korea's Vow To Dismantle Nuclear Program

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DHS Secretary Nielsen's Family Separation Defense Isn't Her First Controversial Position

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President Harry Truman calls NATO a "shield against aggression" at the ceremony that established the 12-nation alliance in Washington in 1949. Truman played a central role in creating many of the international organizations set up in the wake of World War II. President Trump has often questioned their relevance and cost under his "America First" policy. AP hide caption

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AP

With 'America First,' Trump Challenges The World Constructed After World War II

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