Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism, a topic he has covered in the U.S., the Middle East and in many other countries around the world for more than two decades.
Barry Morgenstein/NPR
Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism, a topic he has covered in the U.S., the Middle East and in many other countries around the world for more than two decades.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents around the world and national security reporters in Washington. He heads the Parallels blog and is a frequent contributor to the website on global affairs. Prior to his current position, he was a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996 to 1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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Story Archive

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis and China's Defense Minister Gen. Wei Fenghe stand as the national anthems are played before their meeting at the Pentagon on Friday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

The U.S. military needed skilled operators to handle the telephones in World War I. Known as the Hello Girls, 223 U.S. women served in France. Some worked near the front lines with Gen. John "Black Jack" Pershing, the top U.S. commander. Here, the women work in Seine, France, in 1918. Their story was largely forgotten, but is being recognized on the 100th anniversary of the end of the war. U.S. Army Signal Corps Archives hide caption

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U.S. Army Signal Corps Archives

100 Years On, The 'Hello Girls' Are Recognized For World War I Heroics

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Pallbearers carry the caskets of brothers Cecil Rosenthal, 59, and David Rosenthal, 54, on Tuesday in Pittsburgh, Pa. The brothers were among 11 killed in the mass shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue last Saturday. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Pittsburgh Shooting And Other Cases Point To Rise In Domestic Extremism

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What's Next For Cesar Sayoc, Charged With Mailing Explosives

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Investigators Search For Culprit Behind Potential Explosive Devices

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Members of a haz-mat team help remove a hazardous materials suit from an investigator (in white) who emerged from the U.S. Post Office in West Trenton, N.J., on Oct. 25, 2001. Samples from the facility were part of an investigation into letters containing anthrax. Tom Mihalek/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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CIA Director Gina Haspel Travels To Turkey To Investigate Killing Of Jamal Khashoggi

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Saudi Arabian journalist Jamal Khashoggi is shown at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in 2011. Khashoggi, who Saudi officials say died in their consulate in Istanbul, had a complicated relationship with Saudi Arabia's royal family. At various times in his career, he worked for the Saudi leadership, and at other times he was a critic. Virginia Mayo/AP hide caption

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Virginia Mayo/AP

How The U.S. Could Sanction Saudi Arabia

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Secretary of State Mike Pompeo meets Tuesday with Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the capital Riyadh. They discussed the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who vanished two weeks ago during a visit to the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul, Turkey. Leah Mills/AP hide caption

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Leah Mills/AP

Once A Regional Stabilizer, Saudi Arabia Becomes A Disrupter

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Fact Check: How Much Does Saudi Arabia Spend On Arms Deals With The U.S.?

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International Pressure Mounts On Saudi Arabia After Disappearance Of Jamal Khashoggi

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Does A Lack Of Secrecy Mean Russian Spies Want Their Actions To Be Known?

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Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is shown during a visit to Spain in April. At 33, Mohammed is the kingdom's de facto ruler, and he faces increasing criticism for his handling of issues ranging from the Saudi role in Yemen's war to the recent disappearance of a Saudi journalist in Turkey. Paul White/AP hide caption

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Paul White/AP