Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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Story Archive

Questions Raised As Raytheon And United Technologies Agree To Merge

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After she was detained, CIA officer Marti Peterson was taken to the KGB headquarters, Lubyanka, in central Moscow. She was held for four hours and kicked out of the Soviet Union the next day. She went on to work another 26 years for the CIA. H. Keith Melton Collection at the International Spy Museum hide caption

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H. Keith Melton Collection at the International Spy Museum

'Moscow Rules': How The CIA Operated Under The Watchful Eye Of The KGB

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Pilots Who Flew For Air America In Vietnam Fight For Pensions

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'American Taliban' John Walker Lindh Scheduled To Be Released On Parole

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The CIA had a booth at the recent Awesome Con gathering for movie and comic book superheroes in Washington. It's one quirky example of the way the spy agency is reaching out to a broader potential pool of recruits. Greg Myre/NPR hide caption

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CIA Recruiting Comes Out Into The Open

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H. Keith Melton, a longtime collector of spy artifacts, stands next to the axe that was used to kill Soviet exile Leon Trotsky in Mexico in 1940. The axe is part of Melton's huge collection that he's donated to the new International Spy Museum. Greg Myre/NPR hide caption

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A New Spy Museum That Tackles Torture And Other Tough Questions

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The Poway Chabad Synagogue in Poway, Ca., was attacked last month when a gunman fired at Passover worshippers. The FBI says it is currently investigating 850 cases of domestic terrorism. Denis Poroy/AP hide caption

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Denis Poroy/AP

FBI Is Investigating 850 Cases Of Potential Domestic Terrorism

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Prosecutors say these are some of the drugs found in Christopher Hasson's Silver Spring, Md., apartment. He was arrested on weapons and drug charges and is accused of plotting to kill prominent Americans. U.S. Attorney's Office/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office/Getty Images

Remembering The Victims Of The Easter Sunday Attacks In Sri Lanka

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CIA Director Gina Haspel Makes Rare Public Appearance At Auburn University

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This painting of Virginia Hall hangs in one of the main hallways near the entrance of CIA headquarters. The painting shows her making radio contact with London from an old barn in France to request supplies and personnel. Power for her radio was provided by a bicycle rigged to power an electric generator. Courtesy of CIA hide caption

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Courtesy of CIA

'A Woman Of No Importance' Finally Gets Her Due

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WikiLeaks has made multiple disclosures over the past decade, including one in March 2017 when the group released what it said were CIA technical documents on a range of spying techniques. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

How Much Did WikiLeaks Damage U.S. National Security?

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