Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

A T-shirt bearing the image of Russian President Vladimir Putin reads "The most polite man" at a St. Petersburg market in Russia on Wednesday. Putin began the year in dramatic fashion by hosting the Winter Olympics and seizing Crimea. His year ended, however, with Russia's economy in turmoil and forecasts of a recession for 2015. Dmitry Lovetsky/AP hide caption

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Dmitry Lovetsky/AP

Fidel Castro looks up at the Jefferson Memorial on April 16, 1959. The Cuban leader visited Washington several months after seizing power. But U.S.-Cuban relations quickly frayed, and the U.S. imposed an embargo of the island in 1960. AP hide caption

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AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin, shown delivering his state of the union speech earlier this month, was riding high this year as the country hosted the Winter Olympics. Russia is now embroiled in economic turmoil, and Putin has alienated Western countries that could potentially help. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Nazila Fathi reported from her native Iran for The New York Times. Fearing arrest, she fled in 2009 with her family and now lives in suburban Washington, D.C. Her new book, The Lonely War, describes the challenges of reporting from the country. Hassan Sarbakhshian hide caption

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Hassan Sarbakhshian

The Risks, Rewards And Mysteries Of Reporting From Iran

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Islamic State fighters march in Raqqa, Syria. The group has killed five Western hostages in recent months. In the 1990s, many radical Islamist groups gave interviews to journalists and refrained from kidnapping Westerners. AP hide caption

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AP

Gen. John F. Campbell, the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, speaks during a ceremony in Kabul on Aug. 26. Campbell is overseeing the U.S. drawdown in the country after 13 years of war. Massoud Hossaini/AP hide caption

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Massoud Hossaini/AP

Afghanistan's Way Forward: A Talk With Gen. John Campbell, Decoded

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Saudi Arabia's oil minister, Ali Al-Naimi, shown in Kuwait last month, has played down the drop in oil prices. The country continues to pump oil at high levels, saying it wants to preserve its market share. But this has also contributed to a 25 percent drop in oil prices since June. Yasser Al-Zayyat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yasser Al-Zayyat/AFP/Getty Images

This still image was made from video released by the U.S. military on Tuesday that shows a building hit by a U.S. airstrike in Tall Al Qitar, Syria. The U.S. is describing the bombing campaign in Syria and Iraq as a counterterrorism operation and not a war. U.S. Central Command/AP hide caption

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U.S. Central Command/AP

Iraqi Kurdish peshmerga fighters take up positions around the town of Gwer in northern Iraq on Sept. 18. The Kurdish militia is aligned with the U.S. in the battle against the Islamic State. Mohamed Messara/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Mohamed Messara/EPA/Landov

Nicaragua's Contra rebels in 1990. The U.S. backed the Contras in the 1980s, which led to the ouster of the leftist Sandinista leadership. But the U.S. aid violated American law and contributed to the biggest scandal of President Reagan's administration. Michael Stravato/AP hide caption

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Michael Stravato/AP

A young Iraqi on Thursday stands amid the debris of a double car bomb attack in Baghdad. There was no immediate claim of responsibility. President Obama's plan to attack Islamic State militants in Iraq and Syria will require help from partners on the ground in both countries. Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Al-Rubaye/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama has been wary of open-ended military commitments in the Middle East. But the president, shown speaking in Estonia on Sept. 3, now appears likely to expand the current bombing campaign against the Islamic State. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Pro-Russian rebels prepare their weapons in the eastern city of Donetsk on Aug. 31. Russia's role in Ukraine has raised tensions between Russia and NATO to their highest level since the Soviet breakup more than two decades ago. Mstislav Chernov/AP hide caption

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Mstislav Chernov/AP