Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

In late 2015, the Obama administration began checking the social media accounts of Syrian refugees seeking to come to the U.S. The practice has continued and may be expanded under the Trump administration. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Trump Administration Weighs Increased Scrutiny Of Refugees' Social Media

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Lt. Gen. H.R. McMaster looks on as President Trump announces him as his national security adviser at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in Palm Beach, Fla., on Monday. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

New Trump Adviser H.R. McMaster Faces An Old Challenge — Iraq

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President Trump hosts Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla., on Feb. 10. North Korea tested a missile during Abe's visit last weekend, one of several provocative actions by U.S. rivals during the first month of Trump's presidency. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

President Trump, speaking at the White House on Wednesday, criticized the leaks surrounding his departed national security adviser, Michael Flynn. On the campaign trail, Trump encouraged leaks against his rival Hillary Clinton and said they were inevitable. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Michael Flynn (left) introduces Donald Trump at a campaign rally on Sept. 29, 2016, in Bedford, N.H. After less than a month on the job, Flynn resigned Monday as President Trump's national security adviser. John Locher/AP hide caption

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John Locher/AP

A protester holds a sign at San Francisco International Airport during a demonstration on Jan. 28 to denounce President Trump's executive order freezing immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Unlike Bush, Trump Invokes Terror Threat And Gets Pushback, Not Deference

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Charles Lindbergh speaks at a rally of the America First Committee at Madison Square Garden in New York, on May 23, 1941. Lindbergh was a leading voice of opposition to U.S. involvement in World War II up until the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. AP hide caption

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AP

'America First': From Charles Lindbergh To President Trump

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An Iraqi soldier on Sunday stands near a makeshift armored car left behind by the Islamic State when they were driven out of the eastern side of Mosul. President Trump has ordered the U.S. military to draw up a new plan for the fight against ISIS. Mstyslav Chernov/AP hide caption

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Mstyslav Chernov/AP

Protesters hold signs near the White House during a protest about President Trump's immigration policies on Wednesday. A proposed presidential action would freeze immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries for security reasons. But the list does not include any of the countries whose nationals have killed Americans in the U.S. since Sept. 11, 2001. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

President Trump, with Defense Secretary James Mattis, shows his signature on an executive action to rebuild the military, during an event at the Pentagon on Friday. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Students at Mosul University place the Iraqi national flag at the entrance on Sunday after it was liberated from Islamic State militants. The Iraqi military, supported by the U.S., has retaken the eastern part of the city. ISIS still holds the western part of Mosul, its last major stronghold in Iraq. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

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Khalid Mohammed/AP

President Obama shakes hands with Oman's Deputy Prime Minister Sayyid Fahad Bin Mahmood Al Said at Camp David, Md., on May 14, 2015. Oman said Monday that it had accepted 10 prisoners being released from Guantanamo Bay in Cuba. That reduces the number of detainees remaining at Guantanamo to 45. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin is shown at the Kremlin in Moscow during the recording of his recent New Year's message. Putin's spokesman said Wednesday that the Russian government does not gather compromising material, or kompromat, on political rivals, despite a well-documented history of such behavior. Mikhail Klimentyev/AP hide caption

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Mikhail Klimentyev/AP

A Russian Word Americans Need To Know: 'Kompromat'

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A Palestinian man walks near a construction site for new Israeli housing in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Har Homa in September. The Palestinians claim East Jerusalem as a capital of a future state and object to Israeli building in the eastern part of the city and throughout the West Bank. Israel claims all of Jerusalem as its capital. Mahmoud Illean/AP hide caption

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Mahmoud Illean/AP