Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

DHS Secretary Nielsen's Family Separation Defense Isn't Her First Controversial Position

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President Harry Truman calls NATO a "shield against aggression" at the ceremony that established the 12-nation alliance in Washington in 1949. Truman played a central role in creating many of the international organizations set up in the wake of World War II. President Trump has often questioned their relevance and cost under his "America First" policy. AP hide caption

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AP

With 'America First,' Trump Challenges The World Constructed After World War II

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"I think he wants to get it done. I really feel that very strongly," President Trump says of the pledge by North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un to end a decades-old nuclear stand-off. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump participates in a working luncheon hosted by Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in Singapore on Monday. Officials from both delegations also attended the luncheon. Photo by Ministry of Communications and Information, Republic of Singapore / Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo by Ministry of Communications and Information, Republic of Singapore / Handout/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

David Douglas Duncan looking through camera fitted with prismatic lens. Duncan, who died Thursday in the south of France at age 102, was one of the greatest photojournalists of the 20th century. Sheila Duncan/Courtesy of Harry Ransom Center hide caption

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Sheila Duncan/Courtesy of Harry Ransom Center

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, the former CIA director, and CIA official Andrew Kim, the pair on the left, have dinner with North Korea's Kim Yong Chol, a former intelligence chief, in New York on Wednesday. Current and former spy chiefs are playing an unusually prominent role in arranging a proposed summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. U.S. State Department hide caption

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U.S. State Department

The Spies Have A Leading Role In The North Korea Summit

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President Trump and first lady Melania Trump, accompanied by Adm. Harry Harris (left) and his wife, Bruni Bradley, throw flower pedals while visiting the Pearl Harbor Memorial in Honolulu, Hawaii, last Nov. 3. Trump has nominated Harris to be the U.S. ambassador to South Korea. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Gina Haspel is sworn in to testify at her confirmation hearing before the Senate intelligence committee in Washington on May 9. The full Senate on Thursday confirmed Haspel as CIA director, making her the first woman to hold the job. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Gina Haspel (in white), the nominee to lead the CIA, is welcomed at her confirmation hearing before the Senate intelligence committee by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. (seated), and Vice Chairman Mark Warner, D-Va., in Washington on May 9. The committee voted 10-5 on Wednesday to recommend Haspel's confirmation by the full Senate. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Senate Panel Approves Gina Haspel As CIA Chief; Confirmation Appears Likely

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Gina Haspel, the nominee to be CIA director, testifies at a Senate intelligence committee hearing on May 9. Haspel now appears to have enough Senate support to win confirmation. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The remains of Staff Sgt. Dustin Wright are transferred at Dover Air Force Base, Del., in October. Wright and three other American soldiers were killed in an ambush in Niger. Pfc. Lane Hiser/U.S. Army via AP hide caption

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Pfc. Lane Hiser/U.S. Army via AP

Pentagon Report: Multiple Failures Led To Deaths Of 4 Troops In Niger

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CIA Nominee Gina Haspel Faced Tough Questioning At Her Confirmation Hearing

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CIA Nominee Gina Haspel To Face Tough Questioning At Confirmation Hearing

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CIA director nominee Gina Haspel attends Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's ceremonial swearing-in at the State Department in Washington last week. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters hide caption

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters

CIA Nominee Gina Haspel Faces A Senate Showdown

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