Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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President Gerald Ford shakes hands with Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev on Nov. 24, 1974, in a meeting in the Soviet city of Vladivostok. Several weeks later, Ford signed a law that would place restrictions on Soviet trade with the U.S. for nearly four decades. AP hide caption

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AP

Devon Arthurs, 18, was arrested after leading police to the bodies of his two roommates. He told officers he killed them because they disrespected his recent conversion to Islam. Tampa Police Dept. via AP hide caption

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Tampa Police Dept. via AP

Florida Killings: Radical Islam And The Far Right, Under One Roof

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U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson meets with the Emir of Qatar, Sheik Tamim Bin Hamad al-Thani in Doha, Qatar, on July 11. Tillerson attempted last week to work out a solution with Qatar and several Arab states that have broken off relations, but he was unable to reach a breakthrough. Alexander W. Riedel/AP hide caption

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Alexander W. Riedel/AP

Qatar-Gulf Conflict Puts U.S. In A Bind

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Ethel and Julius Rosenberg attend their 1951 trial in New York. They were charged and convicted of giving nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union under the 1917 Espionage Act. The law was intended for spies but has been used by the Obama and Trump administrations to prosecute suspected national security leakers. AP hide caption

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Once Reserved For Spies, Espionage Act Now Used Against Suspected Leakers

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Attorney General Jeff Sessions arrives to testify during a Senate Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Tuesday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Former FBI Director Comey Testifies On Capitol Hill

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Morning News Brief: Comey's Testimony, And Russians React

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Acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe (left), Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, National Intelligence Director Dan Coats, and National Security Agency Director Adm. Michael Rogers are seated during a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing about the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act on Wednesday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Reality Leigh Winner, 25, has been accused by the U.S. Department of Justice of sending classified material to a news organization. Via Reuters hide caption

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Via Reuters

What We Know About Reality Winner, Government Contractor Accused Of NSA Leak

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Israeli soldiers search Arab prisoners as Israeli forces take over the Old City in East Jerusalem on June 8, 1967, during the Arab-Israeli Six-Day War. Just 11 days after the war ended, U.S. President Lyndon Johnson offered the first of many peace proposals by U.S. presidents over the past half-century. AP hide caption

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AP

50 Years On, U.S. Presidents Still Seek Elusive Peace To A 6-Day War

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U.S. troops man a roadblock on Dec. 26, 1989, in Panama City, preventing access to the Vatican Embassy where Panamanian leader Manuel Noriega was holed up. The U.S. forces played loud rock music in an attempt to bring Noriega out. He surrendered on Jan. 3, 1990. AP hide caption

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AP

Morning News Brief: Kushner And Russia Reports, Europe Tries To Go It Alone

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