Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

Putin's plan to annex regions of Ukraine will likely make it harder to end the war

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The entrance to the newly renovated CIA museum at the agency headquarters in Langley, Va. The ceiling features a variety of spy codes. This one is in Morse Code. The CIA plans to put them all online to see if they can be broken. Courtesy of CIA hide caption

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Courtesy of CIA

Marking 75 years, the CIA opens a new museum and launches a podcast

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Russian President Vladimir Putin gives a speech Wednesday at a ceremony. In separate remarks, Putin said Russia will mobilize additional troops to fight in Ukraine and he expressed support for referendums in parts of Ukraine on joining Russia. Ilya Pitalev/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ilya Pitalev/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

Putin says Russia will mobilize up to 300,000 additional troops to fight in Ukraine

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Top Zelenskyy adviser discusses Ukraine's latest military moves

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy stands with soldiers after attending a national flag-raising ceremony in Izium, Ukraine, on Wednesday. Zelenskyy thanked soldiers for their efforts in retaking the area, as the Ukrainian flag was raised in front of the burned-out city hall building. Leo Correa/AP hide caption

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Leo Correa/AP

A war with recurring themes: Russian blunders, Ukrainian ingenuity

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Ukraine played a game of misdirection and caught Russian forces off guard

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How Ukraine broke the stalemate with Russia

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Russian forces raised a Soviet-era flag in Kherson after capturing the southern Ukrainian city early in the current war. Ukraine carried out new attacks in the Kherson region on Monday, raising the possibility that it is launching a counteroffensive. This photo was taken on May 20 at the World War II memorial in Kherson. Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images

Massive military aid package to Ukraine signals U.S. is in war for the long-haul

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Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko speaks in March in front of an apartment building that was shelled by Russian forces. Klitschko, a former world heavyweight boxing champion, has been mayor of Kyiv since 2014. Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

Once a heavyweight champion, Kyiv's mayor now fights the Russians

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Over months, the U.S. and allies delivered weapons and other support to Ukraine

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Chinese ambassador says U.S. is provoking China with congressional visits to Taiwan

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Watergate changed the rules surrounding presidential records

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President Richard Nixon speaks at the White House on Aug. 9, 1974. He was preparing to leave the day after resigning because of the Watergate scandal. Nixon wanted to take his presidential documents with him, including his infamous tape recordings. But he was barred from doing so, and Congress passed a law that now requires all presidents to hand over their documents to the National Archives. Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images