Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

Story Archive

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy (left) shakes hands with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., in Kyiv, Ukraine, on Saturday. Ukrainian Presidential Press Office via AP hide caption

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Ukrainian Presidential Press Office via AP

Ukraine begins prosecuting Russians for war crimes

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Russian troops arrive back in the Russian city of Ivanovo on Jan. 15 after serving briefly in the former Soviet republic of Kazakhstan. The Russian forces were dispatched to help Kazakhstan's President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev stamp out widespread protests against his authoritarian rule. Kazakhstan is just one of five former Soviet republic where Russian troops have been operating this year. AP hide caption

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AP

Ukraine is the focus, but Russian troops are in several ex-Soviet republics

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Many ex-Soviet republics do not want Russian troops operating in their country

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Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko (right) and his brother Wladimir Klitschko check a phone at city hall on Feb. 27. When Russia invaded Ukraine, many expected Moscow to knock out the Ukrainian communications network. But Ukrainian systems, for both civilians and the military, continue to function. Ukraine, meanwhile, has regularly intercepted Russian military communications. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

How does Ukraine keep intercepting Russian military communications?

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A Ukrainian soldier stands on an armored personnel carrier near the front lines with Russian troops in Izium, in eastern Ukraine, on Monday. Russia fared poorly when it invaded Ukraine eight weeks ago. Now Russia says it has now launched a new offensive focused on eastern Ukraine. Anatolii Stepanov /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Anatolii Stepanov /AFP via Getty Images

As Russia launches a new offensive, what did it learn from the first one?

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In rare public speech, the CIA director spoke about the spy agency's role in Ukraine

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After major setbacks in the war with Ukraine, Russian forces regroup

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Ukrainians in the eastern city of Kharkiv take shelter in a basement on Sunday. The city, which is close to the Russian border, has been hard hit throughout the Russian invasion. Residents are bracing for a new Russian offensive in the eastern part of Ukraine. Sergey Bobok/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergey Bobok/AFP via Getty Images

Russia's Plan A in Ukraine failed. Here's what Plan B could look like

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A Ukrainian soldier stands in front of a destroyed Russian armored personnel carrier in a village on the frontline of the northern part of the Kyiv region on Monday. Russia says its troops are starting to withdraw from Kyiv, thought the Pentagon believes they will likely be deployed elsewhere in Ukraine. Anatolii Stepanov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Anatolii Stepanov/AFP via Getty Images

Russian troops leaving Kyiv area as Moscow focuses more on eastern Ukraine

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Putin publicly put Russian nuclear forces on high alert. What should we make of that?

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McDonald's has closed its more than 800 restaurants in Russia in response to Russia's invasion of Ukraine. This photo at a Moscow McDonald's was taken on March 13, just before it was closed. AP hide caption

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AP

In response to the war, Americans flee Russia in droves

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A look at the stream of weapons the U.S. is supplying to Ukraine

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A Ukrainian soldier fires a U.S.-made Javelin missiles during a training exercise in January. The Ukrainians have used the Javelins to repeatedly take out Russian tanks and other armored vehicles. Ukrainian Defense Ministry via AP hide caption

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Ukrainian Defense Ministry via AP

With small, portable weapons, Ukraine's fighters keep Russia at bay

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This image provided by the Marine Corps shows a Switchblade drone. One hundred Switchblades — which are small enough to be carried in a backpack — are part of the new U.S. package to Ukraine. Cpl. Alexis Moradian/AP hide caption

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Cpl. Alexis Moradian/AP

What the latest U.S. military aid to Ukraine can tell us about the state of the war

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