Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

Story Archive

Ukrainians walk through the unlit streets of the capital Kyiv on Thursday, a day after Russian airstrikes knocked out electricity, heating and water to much of the country. With Russian troops faring poorly on the battlefield, Russia has launched a widespread bombing campaign directed at civilian infrastructure in Ukraine. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Russia strikes, Ukraine repairs, in a battle to survive the winter

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Ukraine says its energy system is teetering after Russian attack

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Ukrainian State Emergency Service firefighters work to extinguish a fire at the scene of a Russian shelling in the town of Vyshgorod outside the capital Kyiv, Ukraine on Wednesday. Authorities reported power outages in multiple cities of Ukraine, including parts of Kyiv, and in neighboring Moldova after renewed strikes Wednesday struck Ukrainian infrastructure facilities. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

Ukraine says it needs help shooting down Russia's missile attacks

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Poland says a missile that crashed on its territory was friendly fire from Ukraine

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Members of the Polish police inspect the fields near the village of Przewodow, Poland, where an explosion killed two people Tuesday. Polish police department handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Polish police department handout/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The Ukrainian capital of Kyiv came under sustained Russian missile attacks

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Ukraine came under attack from Russian missiles, and Poland reports explosions

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In this photo provided by the Ukrainian Presidential Press Office, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, surrounded by his guards, walks on central square during his visit to Kherson on Monday. Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/AP hide caption

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Ukrainian Presidential Press Office/AP

Ukrainians in Kherson celebrate the withdrawal of Russian troops

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In a major blow to Putin, Russia says it has fully withdrawn from Kherson

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An elderly woman walks in the southern Ukrainian village of Arkhanhelske, outside Kherson, on Nov. 3. The Russians occupied the village until recently. Now Ukrainian forces are moving into villages where the Russians left. The Russians said they completed their withdrawal from Kherson on Friday, marking a major victory for Ukraine. Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bulent Kilic/AFP via Getty Images

Russia retreats from Kherson. Why is the U.S. nudging Ukraine on peace talks?

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Russia has been threatening to use nuclear weapons in Ukraine

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