Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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Sandra Joyce, the head of global intelligence at the cybersecurity firm FireEye, speaks at the company's Cyber Defense Summit in 2018. Private tech companies are increasingly taking the lead in reporting information about suspected attacks by foreign actors. In some cases, the companies sell their reports to the U.S. intelligence community. Courtesy of FireEye hide caption

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Courtesy of FireEye

Tech Companies Take A Leading Role In Warning Of Foreign Cyber Threats

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People hold posters showing the portrait of Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani at a protest outside the U.S. Consulate on Jan. 5 in Istanbul, Turkey. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris McGrath/Getty Images

How Trump Has Tried To Scale Back Nuclear Programs In North Korea And Iran

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Unpacking President Trump's Latest Comments On Iran

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The Latest On Iran's Missile Attacks On U.S. Troops In Iraq

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Iran Vows Retaliation For Drone Strike On General — And It Has Options

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Evaluating The Evidence Of 'Imminent Attacks'

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Why The U.S. Waited So Long To Act On Iran Gen. Qassem Soleimani

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Replacement Chosen For Iranian General Killed In U.S. Airstrike

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A Look At U.S. Interests In Iraq

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Stories Of The Decade: Edward Snowden And Mass Surveillance

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DOJ Watchdog Will Defend His FBI-Russia Probe Findings

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Michael Horowitz To Testify Before Congress After Delivering Watchdog Report

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Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz, shown here in 2018, released a report Monday on the 2016 Trump campaign and its links to Russia. He found the FBI was justified in opening the investigation but sharply criticized the way the bureau pursued surveillance warrants against Trump campaign adviser Carter Page. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP