Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

Story Archive

Watergate changed the rules surrounding presidential records

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President Richard Nixon speaks at the White House on Aug. 9, 1974. He was preparing to leave the day after resigning because of the Watergate scandal. Nixon wanted to take his presidential documents with him, including his infamous tape recordings. But he was barred from doing so, and Congress passed a law that now requires all presidents to hand over their documents to the National Archives. Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

Here's how Nixon's downfall forever changed the rules around presidential documents

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American pilot Francis Gary Powers (far right) during his 1960 trial in Moscow. Powers was shot down while flying a U-2 spy plane over the Soviet Union. He was jailed for nearly two years before he was freed in a swap for a Soviet spy imprisoned in the U.S. AP hide caption

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The Cold War to Brittney Griner: a new twist in U.S.-Russia prisoner swaps

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Osama bin Laden (left) sits with his No. 2, Ayman al-Zawahiri, for an interview that was published in November 2001, shortly after the 9/11 attacks. The U.S. says it killed al-Zawahiri in a drone strike in Kabul on Sunday. Visual News/Getty Images hide caption

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How the U.S. took out an al-Qaida mastermind despite having no boots on the ground

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U.S. killed al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri in a drone strike, officials say

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Russian arms dealer Viktor Bout is shown in custody in Bangkok, Thailand, in 2008. Bout was later extradited to the U.S. and convicted of conspiring to kill Americans. He's serving a 25-year sentence, but he may be part of a prisoner swap the U.S. and Russia are trying to negotiate. Chumsak Kanoknan/Getty Images hide caption

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Chumsak Kanoknan/Getty Images

To free 2 Americans in Russia, the U.S. may have to trade a notorious arms smuggler

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CIA Director William Burns testifies before the House Intelligence Committee in March. Burns has focused the agency more on U.S. rivalries with Russia and China. He's been involved in the public release of U.S. intelligence on Russia's military plans in Ukraine, and he's established the China Mission Center at CIA headquarters. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

At 75, the CIA is back where it started - countering the Kremlin

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U.S. defense officials pledge to keep weapons supply flowing to Ukraine

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The Russian Black Sea naval headquarters at Sevastopol, Crimea, in 2008. In the background on the right is a Russian destroyer. The Russian tall ship Padalla (with white sails) is in the center. In the foreground is the Monument to Scuttled Ships, marking Russia's intentional destruction of its own naval fleet in the Crimean War in 1854 as British and French warships approached. AP hide caption

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How Russia's current war in Ukraine echoes its Crimean War of the 1850s

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Firefighters work to rescue residents and put out a fire after a Russian missile hit an apartment building in Ukraine's capital Kyiv on Sunday morning. As President Biden and other leaders of the Group of 7 nations meet in Germany, Russia has unleashed a barrage of airstrikes across Ukraine over the weekend. Nariman El-Mofty/AP hide caption

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Nariman El-Mofty/AP