Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

Story Archive

Thursday

Pentagon manages new tensions after a Russian warplane hit an unarmed U.S. drone

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Tuesday

An MQ-9 Reaper remotely piloted aircraft flies by during a training mission at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada on Nov. 17, 2015. Isaac Brekken/Getty Images hide caption

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Isaac Brekken/Getty Images

Despite downed drone, U.S. says it will keep flying near Ukraine

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Monday

Biden makes an AUKUS submarine deal in the effort to counter China

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Thursday

Senate panel holds hearing on global threats with heads of U.S. security agencies

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Wednesday

Top U.S. security officials discuss Russia, China in assessment of worldwide threats

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Thursday

Foreign rivals didn't cause Havana Syndrome, U.S. intelligence concludes

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Wednesday

A car drives past the U.S. Embassy in Havana in 2019. Americans working at the embassy began reporting unexplained illnesses in 2016. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

U.S. Intelligence: foreign rivals didn't cause Havana Syndrome

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Tuesday

U.S. Dept of Energy says with 'low confidence' that COVID may have leaked from a lab

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A team of scientists and science students from Chulalongkorn University collect a blood sample from a bat on September 12, 2020 in Ratchaburi, Thailand. Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images hide caption

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Lauren DeCicca/Getty Images

Saturday

Pedestrians walk past a large mural of Russian President Vladimir Putin on a residential building in Kashira, a town south of Moscow, on Thursday. Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Natalia Kolesnikova/AFP via Getty Images

The key trends to watch in the Russia-Ukraine war

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Thursday

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a patriotic concert at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow on Wednesday. Mikhail Metzel/SPUTNIK/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mikhail Metzel/SPUTNIK/AFP via Getty Images

Putinology: the art of analyzing the man in the Kremlin

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Monday

The latest on U.S. fighter jets shooting objects out of the sky

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National Security Council Coordinator for Strategic Communications John Kirby speaks during the daily press briefing in the James S Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, DC, on February 13, 2023. MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MANDEL NGAN/AFP via Getty Images

Pentagon says Americans shouldn't worry about the objects the Air Force shot down

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Monday

The U.S. has detected 4 other recent spy balloons. Why didn't we hear about them?

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The suspected Chinese spy balloon drifts to the ocean after being shot down off the coast in Surfside Beach, S.C., on Saturday. Randall Hill/Reuters hide caption

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Randall Hill/Reuters

Thursday

Pentagon is tracking a spy balloon, which it suspects belongs to China, over the U.S.

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A woman walks past graffiti depicting a Ukrainian soldier firing a missile, in Kyiv on Jan. 25. The Russians are fighting an intense air war, but it involves mostly missiles, drones and anti-aircraft system. Traditional air strikes by piloted war planes have been relatively rare. SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SERGEI SUPINSKY/AFP via Getty Images

Russia and Ukraine battle daily in the sky. So where are the pilots?

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Wednesday

Why tanks could be a game-changer for Ukraine

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U.S. Abrams tanks participate in a live fire demonstration during training exercises in Poland in September 2022. President Biden announced Wednesday that the U.S. will be sending 31 Abrams tanks to Ukraine. Germany also said it will be sending tanks. Omar Marques/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Marques/Getty Images

Tuesday

Classified documents have been found in Mike Pence's private home

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Monday

Russia and Ukraine are receiving new weaponry that could shape the war

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Saturday

U.S. and allies pledge more heavy weapons for Ukraine

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Friday

U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin (left) and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, discuss details of a huge U.S. and NATO arms package for Ukraine at the U.S. air base in Ramstein, Germany, on Friday. ANDRE PAIN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDRE PAIN/AFP via Getty Images