Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

Story Archive

Firefighters work to rescue residents and put out a fire after a Russian missile hit an apartment building in Ukraine's capital Kyiv on Sunday morning. As President Biden and other leaders of the Group of 7 nations meet in Germany, Russia has unleashed a barrage of airstrikes across Ukraine over the weekend. Nariman El-Mofty/AP hide caption

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Nariman El-Mofty/AP

4 months since Russia invaded, Ukraine faces a stark contrast

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Russian forces have captured nearly all of Sievierodonetsk

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Bridget Brink, the new U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, speaks at a press conference on June 2 after presenting her credentials to Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelenskyy in a ceremony at St. Sophia's Cathedral in Kyiv The U.S. Embassy shut down shortly before Russia invaded Ukraine in February and reopened a month ago. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

U.S. ambassador to Ukraine: 'It's going to be a long, grinding, tough war'

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European leaders meet with Ukrainian President Zelenskyy to show unity and support

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Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi (left), German Chancellor Olaf Scholz (second left), Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy (center), French President Emmanuel Macron (second right), and Romanian President Klaus Iohannis meet at the Ukrainian presidential compound Thursday in a collective show of European support for Ukraine in its war against Russia. Ludovic Marin/AP hide caption

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Ludovic Marin/AP

Momentum in the war has shifted and Ukraine says it needs more weapons

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One of President Zelenskyy's top advisers told NPR what Ukraine wants

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Despite help from the U.S., Ukraine says it's outgunned by Russia

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Russia is still blocking key Ukrainian port as fighting continues in Ukraine's east

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Kyiv hit by Russian airstrikes as information from Mariupol is throttled

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Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks at the unveiling ceremony of a monument to Vladimir the Great outside the Kremlin in 2016. The 10th-century ruler of Kyiv never lived in Moscow. But Putin has sought to portray Vladimir the Great as a key figure in a unified, centralized Russian state that includes Ukraine. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Volodymyr vs. Vladimir: How rival statues explain the Russia-Ukraine conflict

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