Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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Biden's National Security, Foreign Policy Nominees Face Senate Confirmation Hearings

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What The U.S. Capitol Looks Like Ahead Of The Inauguration

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Vowing To Uphold Constitutional Process, Joint Chiefs Of Staff Condemn Capitol Riot

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Researchers have used crowdsourcing to scrutinize video and photos from the riot at the Capitol on Jan. 6 and have identified some of those who took part. The researchers have shared their information with law enforcement. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

William Burns, shown here during a 2019 event, is President-elect Joe Biden's pick to lead the CIA. Noam Galai/Getty Images for National Committee on American Foreign Policy hide caption

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Noam Galai/Getty Images for National Committee on American Foreign Policy

Longtime Diplomat William Burns Is Biden's Pick To Lead CIA

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Authorities Track Down Members Of Capitol Mob After They Return Home

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Pro-Trump extremists clash with police and security forces as they invade the Inauguration Day platform on Wednesday. Security forces were quickly overrun as the mob reached the Capitol. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

Pro-Trump Mob's Storming Of U.S. Capitol Reveals Many Security Issues

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Fireworks explode over the Kremlin and Red Square during New Year's celebrations on Jan. 1 in Moscow. The U.S. government says a widespread computer incursion into U.S. government and private computer networks was likely carried out by Russia. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

A Look Back At What Happened After The Killing Of Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani

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Dr. Jonas E. Salk, who discovered the polio vaccine, reads with his wife and three boys in Ann Arbor, Mich., on April 11, 1955. The boys were among the first vaccinated during testing. The family was photographed the night before an announcement the vaccine was effective. Pictured from left are Jonathan, 5; Donna Salk; Peter, 11; Salk; and Darrell, 8. AP hide caption

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From Polio To The COVID Vaccine, Dr. Peter Salk Sees Great Progress

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Experts Weigh In On How U.S. Should Respond To Massive Computer Hack

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The Pentagon is one of several government entities that have been part of a hack that hinged on a vulnerability in SolarWinds' Orion network monitoring products. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

What We Know About Russia's Alleged Hack Of The U.S. Government And Tech Companies

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Kevin Mandia, CEO of the cybersecurity firm FireEye, testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee in 2017. Mandia's company was the first to sound the alarm about the massive hack of government agencies and private companies on Dec. 8. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

The Latest On The Massive Cyberattack On The U.S.

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