Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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Story Archive

FBI Director Christopher Wray testifies before the Senate's Homeland Security Committee on Sept. 24. Wray and other national security officials say they've taken extensive safeguards to protect this year's election. This message is often in sharp contrast with President Trump, who has repeatedly questioned the integrity of the vote. Tom Williams/AP hide caption

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Tom Williams/AP

Normally Invisible, National Security Figures Assume Prominent Election Role

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Joint Chiefs Of Staff Members On Quarantine After Coast Guard Officer Tests Positive

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Army Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, is among several top military officials who are quarantining at home. They attended meetings last week with Adm. Charles Ray, the vice commandant of the Coast Guard, who has tested positive for COVID-19. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Dr. Sean Conley, physician to President Trump, talks with reporters at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center on Monday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Former CIA Director John Brennan testifies on Capitol Hill in May 2017 before the House Intelligence Committee Russia Investigation Task Force. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Effects Of Trump's Positive Coronavirus Test On National Security

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Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson (left) and Detroit Pistons Vice Chairman Arn Tellem talk about voting last Thursday, when balloting began in the state. The Pistons are allowing their arena to be used as a polling station. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

'Russia Doesn't Have To Make Fake News': Biggest Election Threat Is Closer To Home

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Democrats Say Trump's Reported Debts Create National Security Risks

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The Senate and House intelligence committees say the director of national intelligence, John Ratcliffe, has agreed to resume face-to-face briefings on threats to the November election. Ratcliffe said last month he was canceling the briefings because the information was leaked to the media. He's shown here at his confirmation hearing in May. Gabriella Demczuk/AP hide caption

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Gabriella Demczuk/AP

Former FBI Agent Ali Soufan, shown here in New York in 2018, interrogated many al-Qaida suspects after the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. Soufan's 2011 book on that topic, The Black Banners, included many redactions. A new version was released this week without the redactions. Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal /AFP via Getty Images

For Ex-FBI Interrogator Ali Soufan, Sept. 11 Still Frames His Life

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The whistleblower says Chad Wolf, the acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, twice told him to withhold reporting on Russian threats to the election. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Whistleblower Alleges DHS Told Him To Stop Reporting On Russia Threat

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U.S. troops in the Vietnam War read the Stars and Stripes newspaper in 1969. The Pentagon plans to shut down the paper, for generations aimed at U.S. military personnel, at the end of this month. Godfrey/AP hide caption

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Godfrey/AP

Intelligence Chief Ends In-Person Briefings On Foreign Interference In 2020 Election

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The former director of the National Security Agency, Adm. Mike Rogers, tells NPR that in the run-up to the 2016 election he wishes "we had taken more direct, more public action (against Russia) sooner as opposed to doing so after the election." He's shown here in 2014. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Ex-Intel Chief: 'I Wish We Had Taken More Action' Against Russian Meddling

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A satellite image from Planet Labs, a private satellite company, shows the exhaust from a North Korean missile test on May 4, 2019. Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Planet Labs Inc.

From Desert Battlefields To Coral Reefs, Private Satellites Revolutionize The View

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