Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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How The Role Of The Department Of Homeland Security Has Evolved

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Russell Travers, who was the acting director of National Counterterrorism Center, is shown in an appearance before a Senate committee in 2018. Travers, who was ousted from his position in March of this year, says in an interview with NPR that the center is not being given the resources needed to perform its mission of monitoring and analyzing terrorist threats worldwide. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Ex-Counterterrorism Chief: Cutbacks Raise Risk Of New Attacks

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U.S., Canada, Britain Say Russian Hackers Are After COVID-19 Vaccine Data

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Intelligence Agencies Warn Russian Hackers Are Targeting Coronavirus Vaccine Research

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A volunteer receives a shot in a clinical trial for a potential coronavirus vaccine. U.S. intelligence officials say Russian hackers are attempting to break into U.S. health care organizations working on a vaccine. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin (second from left) meets military officials, including Igor Kostyukov (far right), the deputy chief of military intelligence for the GRU. The 2018 event in Moscow marked the centenary of the GRU, which has been involved in many major operations in recent years. U.S. intelligence suspects the GRU of involvement in a reported bounty program in Afghanistan. Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik/Kremlin pool photo via AP hide caption

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Alexei Druzhinin/Sputnik/Kremlin pool photo via AP

Cited In Many Operations, Russia's GRU Is Suspected In Afghan Bounty Case

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Key Figure In The Impeachment Inquiry Retires From The Military

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The President's Daily Briefing is the top-secret intelligence report the CIA presents to the president every weekday. The book shown here is for a briefing delivered to President George W. Bush in 2002. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Experts Say Intel Should Have Reached Trump On Russian Bounty Program

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Russian Bounty Intel Sparks Confusion Over How President Is Briefed

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Janis Shinwari wearing his body armor in Afghanistan in 2008. He worked with U.S. troops in some of the most dangerous parts of the country, and the Taliban put him on a 'kill list.' Matt Zeller hide caption

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Matt Zeller

Afghan Interpreter Who Saved U.S. Troops Gets American Citizenship

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Then-national security adviser John Bolton at the White House in July 2019. Bolton received a reported $2 million advance for his book about his time in the Trump administration, but a judge has raised the possibility that he may not be able to keep it. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

John Bolton's Big Paycheck For His Book May Be In Jeopardy

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Russian Court Convicts An American Of Spying

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Demonstrator Aaron Covington shakes hands with National Guard troops and DEA police at a protest in Washington on Saturday over the death of George Floyd. President Trump announced that the National Guard forces would be pulling out of the nation's capital after several days of peaceful demonstrations. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP