Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

Story Archive

Wednesday

Why tanks could be a game-changer for Ukraine

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U.S. Abrams tanks participate in a live fire demonstration during training exercises in Poland in September 2022. President Biden announced Wednesday that the U.S. will be sending 31 Abrams tanks to Ukraine. Germany also said it will be sending tanks. Omar Marques/Getty Images hide caption

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Omar Marques/Getty Images

Tuesday

Classified documents have been found in Mike Pence's private home

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Monday

Russia and Ukraine are receiving new weaponry that could shape the war

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Saturday

U.S. and allies pledge more heavy weapons for Ukraine

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Friday

U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin (left) and the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gen. Mark Milley, discuss details of a huge U.S. and NATO arms package for Ukraine at the U.S. air base in Ramstein, Germany, on Friday. ANDRE PAIN/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANDRE PAIN/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

Mishandling of classified documents happens more than you might think

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Tuesday

How the government keeps track of classified documents

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Wednesday

MEXICO CITY, MEXICO - JANUARY 10: U.S. President Joe Biden speaks during a message for the media as part of the '2023 North American Leaders' Summit at Palacio Nacional on January 10, 2023 in Mexico City, Mexico. Hector Vivas/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Vivas/Getty Images

Tuesday

What we know about the classified documents found in Biden's think tank

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Saturday

The U.S. is sending Ukraine its largest aid package yet

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Friday

Ukrainians in the capital Kyiv take part in the 2004 "Orange Revolution." The demonstrators protested against what they said were Russian attempts to rig the country's presidential election. Ukrainians say Russia's invasion this year is the latest attempt by Moscow over the past century to maintain control and influence over Ukraine. Ivan Sekretarev /AP hide caption

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Ivan Sekretarev /AP

A century and counting: Ukraine's ongoing fight to free itself from Russia

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Wednesday

Emergency workers and police examine a building that was hit during a Russian drone strike Wednesday morning in Kyiv. Ukraine says it shot down all 13 drones that targeted the capital. The damage was apparently caused after the drone was hit and came crashing down. Sergei Supinsky /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky /AFP via Getty Images

Saturday

A painting by British street artist Banksy amidst destroyed buildings in Borodianka on Saturday. The image shows a young boy tossing a man to the floor. Both are in martial arts attire. The man is widely assumed to be Russian leader Vladimir Putin, a judo enthusiast. Natalie Keyssar for NPR hide caption

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Natalie Keyssar for NPR

Life in a Ukrainian town: rampaging Russians, power cuts, a visit by Banksy

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Tuesday

Technicians from DTEK, Ukraine's largest private energy company, work to replace a cable at a substation in the Teremky neighborhood of Kyiv on Wednesday. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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Pete Kiehart for NPR

In an ongoing race, Ukraine tries to repair faster than Russia bombs

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