Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

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Mullah Abdul Ghani Baradar, the Taliban's top political leader (second from left), has been involved in the group's negotiations with U.S. officials. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

U.S. And The Taliban May Be Near A Deal. What Does That Mean For Afghanistan?

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Justice Department Raises Questions About Jail Where Epstein Died

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Trump Says He Will Not Nominate John Ratcliffe For Director Of National Intelligence

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Trump Expected To Nominate Rep. John Ratcliffe As Director Of National Intelligence

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Director Of National Intelligence Dan Coats Resigns

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Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee in January. Coats often operated behind the scenes, but when he spoke publicly, his assessments were often at odds with President Trump Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Dan Coats, Who Challenged President Trump, Is Ousted From Top Intelligence Job

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U.K. Says It Won't Join The U.S. In Maximum Pressure Campaign Against Iran

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In this 2011 photo, Hu Jintao, then China's president, visits the Confucius Institute at the Walter Payton College Preparatory High School in Chicago. China established more than 100 Confucius Institutes, which provide language and culture programs, at U.S. schools. But at least 13 universities have dropped the program due to a law that raises concerns about Chinese spying. Chris Walker/AP hide caption

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Chris Walker/AP

As Scrutiny Of China Grows, Some U.S. Schools Drop A Language Program

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Trump Reportedly Ordered Cyberattacks On Iran After Calling Off Airstrikes

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U.S. Reportedly Trying To Implant Malware That Could Sabotage Russia's Electrical Grid

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Questions Raised As Raytheon And United Technologies Agree To Merge

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After she was detained, CIA officer Marti Peterson was taken to the KGB headquarters, Lubyanka, in central Moscow. She was held for four hours and kicked out of the Soviet Union the next day. She went on to work another 26 years for the CIA. H. Keith Melton Collection at the International Spy Museum hide caption

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H. Keith Melton Collection at the International Spy Museum

'Moscow Rules': How The CIA Operated Under The Watchful Eye Of The KGB

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Pilots Who Flew For Air America In Vietnam Fight For Pensions

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