Greg Myre Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on counter-terrorism.
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Greg Myre

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Greg Myre 2016
Barry Morgenstein/NPR

Greg Myre

National Security Correspondent

Greg Myre is a national security correspondent with a focus on the intelligence community, a position that follows his many years as a foreign correspondent covering conflicts around the globe.

He was previously the international editor for NPR.org, working closely with NPR correspondents abroad and national security reporters in Washington. He remains a frequent contributor to the NPR website on global affairs. He also worked as a senior editor at Morning Edition from 2008-2011.

Before joining NPR, Myre was a foreign correspondent for 20 years with The New York Times and The Associated Press.

He was first posted to South Africa in 1987, where he witnessed Nelson Mandela's release from prison and reported on the final years of apartheid. He was assigned to Pakistan in 1993 and often traveled to war-torn Afghanistan. He was one of the first reporters to interview members of an obscure new group calling itself the Taliban.

Myre was also posted to Cyprus and worked throughout the Middle East, including extended trips to Iran, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Saudi Arabia. He went to Moscow from 1996-1999, covering the early days of Vladimir Putin as Russia's leader.

He was based in Jerusalem from 2000-2007, reporting on the heaviest fighting ever between Israelis and the Palestinians.

In his years abroad, he traveled to more than 50 countries and reported on a dozen wars. He and his journalist wife Jennifer Griffin co-wrote a 2011 book on their time in Jerusalem, entitled, This Burning Land: Lessons from the Front Lines of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict.

Myre is a scholar at the Middle East Institute in Washington and has appeared as an analyst on CNN, PBS, BBC, C-SPAN, Fox, Al Jazeera and other networks. He's a graduate of Yale University, where he played football and basketball.

Story Archive

Russian President Vladimir Putin joins hands with the Russian-appointed leaders of four Ukrainian regions that Moscow annexed on Sept. 30, despite strong international opposition to the move. On the same day, Putin also raised the possibility of using a nuclear weapon in Ukraine. Grigory Sysoyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Grigory Sysoyev/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP

How likely is a Russian nuclear strike in Ukraine?

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Putin's plan to annex regions of Ukraine will likely make it harder to end the war

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The entrance to the newly renovated CIA museum at the agency headquarters in Langley, Va. The ceiling features a variety of spy codes. This one is in Morse Code. The CIA plans to put them all online to see if they can be broken. Courtesy of CIA hide caption

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Courtesy of CIA

Marking 75 years, the CIA opens a new museum and launches a podcast

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Russian President Vladimir Putin gives a speech Wednesday at a ceremony. In separate remarks, Putin said Russia will mobilize additional troops to fight in Ukraine and he expressed support for referendums in parts of Ukraine on joining Russia. Ilya Pitalev/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ilya Pitalev/Sputnik/AFP via Getty Images

Putin says Russia will mobilize up to 300,000 additional troops to fight in Ukraine

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Top Zelenskyy adviser discusses Ukraine's latest military moves

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Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy stands with soldiers after attending a national flag-raising ceremony in Izium, Ukraine, on Wednesday. Zelenskyy thanked soldiers for their efforts in retaking the area, as the Ukrainian flag was raised in front of the burned-out city hall building. Leo Correa/AP hide caption

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Leo Correa/AP

A war with recurring themes: Russian blunders, Ukrainian ingenuity

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Ukraine played a game of misdirection and caught Russian forces off guard

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How Ukraine broke the stalemate with Russia

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Russian forces raised a Soviet-era flag in Kherson after capturing the southern Ukrainian city early in the current war. Ukraine carried out new attacks in the Kherson region on Monday, raising the possibility that it is launching a counteroffensive. This photo was taken on May 20 at the World War II memorial in Kherson. Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Borodulin/AFP via Getty Images

Massive military aid package to Ukraine signals U.S. is in war for the long-haul

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Kyiv Mayor Vitali Klitschko speaks in March in front of an apartment building that was shelled by Russian forces. Klitschko, a former world heavyweight boxing champion, has been mayor of Kyiv since 2014. Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Supinsky/AFP via Getty Images

Once a heavyweight champion, Kyiv's mayor now fights the Russians

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Over months, the U.S. and allies delivered weapons and other support to Ukraine

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Chinese ambassador says U.S. is provoking China with congressional visits to Taiwan

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Watergate changed the rules surrounding presidential records

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