Hannah Bloch Hannah Bloch is lead digital editor on NPR's international desk, overseeing the work of NPR correspondents and freelance journalists around the world.
Stories By

Hannah Bloch

Mike Morgan/NPR
Hannah Bloch, photographed for NPR, 19 September 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Hannah Bloch

Lead Digital Editor, International Desk

Hannah Bloch is lead digital editor on NPR's international desk, overseeing the work of NPR correspondents and freelance journalists around the world.

Her first contributions to NPR were on the other side of the microphone when, as a writer and editor at National Geographic, she was interviewed by NPR for her reporting from Afghanistan and on the role failure plays in exploration. During her 2004-2014 tenure at National Geographic, she also reported from Easter Island and covered a range of topics including archaeology and global health.

From 2014-2017, Bloch wrote the "Work in Progress" column at The Wall Street Journal, highlighting efforts by social entrepreneurs and problem-solvers to make a measurable difference in the world.

Earlier in her career, she was Time Magazine's first full-time correspondent in Pakistan and Afghanistan, covering the rise and fall of the Taliban regime, Pakistan's nuclear tests, and the regrouping of al-Qaida after Sept. 11. She also established and led CNN's first bureau in Islamabad.

Bloch was part of NPR's Peabody Award-winning team covering the Ebola outbreak in 2014 and was the recipient of a John S. Knight Professional Journalism Fellowship at Stanford University and a Freedom Forum Asia Studies Fellowship at the University of Hawaii.

She is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania and earned master's degrees in journalism and international affairs from Columbia University.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Supporters of Venezuelan opposition leader Juan Guaidó take part in a march in Caracas in February 2019. Amid Venezuela's isolation and catastrophic economic conditions, Guaidó emerged as a key challenger to Nicolás Maduro's rule, but has had difficulty sustaining his initial mass momentum in support. Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty Images

Fewer than 1 million people live in Amsterdam, but almost 20 million visit each year. The city is working to crack down on "overtourism." Above, bicycles are parked outside the city's Sexyland nightclub. Horacio Villalobos/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Horacio Villalobos/Corbis via Getty Images

A Saudi woman celebrates with her friends as she drives her car in al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, on Sunday. The lifting of the ban on women driving marks a milestone for women in the kingdom who have had to rely on drivers, male relatives, taxis and ride-hailing services to get to work, go shopping and simply move around. Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Hamad I Mohammed/Reuters

President Trump gestures to reporters as he meets with North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un at the start of the U.S.-North Korea summit in Singapore on Tuesday. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

Cross-country skier Iivo Niskanen of Finland celebrates winning the men's 50-kilometer mass start classic race on Feb. 24. His was Finland's first gold medal of the Pyeongchang Games. Ian MacNicol/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ian MacNicol/Getty Images

Artists perform near the Olympic flame during the closing ceremony. "Although parting is sad, we will remember Pyeongchang with beautiful memories," said Lee Hee-beom, the Pyeongchang Olympics organizing committee president. Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Martin Bernetti/AFP/Getty Images

More than 1,200 people, including 1,000 residents of Gangwon province, form the shape of a dove out of candlelight during the opening ceremony. Francois-Xavier Marit/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Francois-Xavier Marit/AFP/Getty Images

Dina Alhamrani's photos (at right) show a bride wearing a red "pre-wedding dress" and gold-leaf henna designs on her hands. "I want to tell brides never to let go of their heritage," Alhamrani says. "We have very, very vibrant colors. That's the message I try to convey. And the bride is looking at the light: That's a happy thing that she wants." Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eslah Attar/NPR

Demonstrators shout anti-U.S. slogans at a protest in Karachi, Pakistan, on Tuesday, a day after President Trump tweeted that Pakistan has "given us nothing but lies & deceit, thinking of our leaders as fools." Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images