Jessica Deahl Jessica Deahl is an editor for NPR's award-winning program All Things Considered.
Jessica Deahl, NPR
Stories By

Jessica Deahl

Jessica Deahl

Editor, All Things Considered

Jessica Deahl is an editor for NPR's award-winning program All Things Considered. There she works closely with NPR hosts in the shaping of program segments and arranges interviews with key newsmakers in the most central, relevant stories of the day.

She is the recipient of a 2017 Gracie Award from The Alliance of Women in Media for a 12-part NPR series called "Stretched: Working Parents' Juggling Act," which covered topics ranging from the dearth of parental leave to the scarcity of childcare in the United States.

She did her graduate studies at Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, and her undergraduate studies at Arizona State University's Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communications.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Fourth-generation funeral home director Patrick Kearns (left) and his business partner and brother-in-law Paul Kearns-Stanley stand in front of their funeral home in North Richmond Hill, Queens. Fiona Kearns hide caption

toggle caption
Fiona Kearns

New York Funeral Director: Pandemic Has Been A Wave That 'Knocks You Over'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/888280295/890558137" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Ringmaster Johnathan Lee Iverson enters the ring in Fairfax, Va., at one of the final performances of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. Marian Carrasquero/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Marian Carrasquero/NPR

From The Big Top Into The Big World: A Ringling Ringmaster's Final Bow

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528672217/529175825" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Chelsea Beck/NPR

Child Care Scarcity Has Very Real Consequences For Working Families

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/506448993/508075339" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

(Left) Edith Einarsson, Kristina Ingemarsdotter Persson, Samuel Einarsson and Per Einarsson. (Center) Yao Zhang, Shanshan Zhang and Rachel Meng. (Right) Lama Dossary and her daughter Leila. Linda Johansson/Courtesy of Kristina Ingemarsdotter Persson; Courtesy of Rachel Meng; Bushra Al-Hinai/Courtesy of Lama Dossary hide caption

toggle caption
Linda Johansson/Courtesy of Kristina Ingemarsdotter Persson; Courtesy of Rachel Meng; Bushra Al-Hinai/Courtesy of Lama Dossary

Countries Around The World Beat The U.S. On Paid Parental Leave

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495839588/496911666" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tricia Olson takes a selfie of herself and her son Augustus, or Gus, who sits in his car seat. Olson took three weeks of unpaid leave from her job at a towing company in Rock Springs, Wyo., after giving birth. Courtesy of Tricia Olson hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Tricia Olson

On Your Mark, Give Birth, Go Back To Work

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/495839747/496592336" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As raw documents from contemporary diplomats, the classified dispatches released by WikiLeaks offer insight that no book or article could. But some professors worry that using the cables in the classroom could hurt their students' future careers. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP/Getty Images

Professors Differ On Ethics Of Using WikiLeaks Cables

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/133334302/133557355" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript