Lauren Migaki Lauren Migaki is a senior producer with NPR's education desk.
Lauren Migaki
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Lauren Migaki

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Lauren Migaki
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Lauren Migaki

Senior Producer, Education

Lauren Migaki is a senior producer with NPR's education desk. She helps tell stories about teacher strikes, college access and a new high school for young men in Washington D.C. She also produces and hosts NPR's podcast about the Student Podcast Challenge.

In 2019, she worked with NPR's Life Kit to lead the team's parenting coverage. In 2017, Migaki was the producer to develop and pilot Up First, NPR's first-ever daily news podcast.

Before that, she spent seven years as a producer, director and line producer for Morning Edition – mostly on the overnight shift. She traveled alongside NPR hosts and reporters to tell stories in Crimea, Israel and the Brazilian Amazon. In 2014, the team earned an Edward R. Murrow award for their coverage of deforestation in the Amazon rain forest. Other highlights from her time at Morning Edition include working on interviews with Dolly Parton, Oprah and Joni Mitchell.

In addition to her work at Morning Edition, Migaki spent a year producing Pop Culture Happy Hour, NPR's pop culture podcast.

Migaki graduated from Syracuse University with a degree in Graphic Design.

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Story Archive

Ryan Johnson for NPR

Can Screens Help Your Child's Brain? 4 Tips To Get The Most From Kids' Media

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Sesame Workshop

Without enough students to fill up its classrooms, Gaspar Vila Mayans elementary, a public school seated in a low-income area in San Juan, is facing the possibility of closure. Lauren Migaki/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Migaki/NPR

School Closures Loom In Puerto Rico As Enrollment Shrinks After Maria

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Two people swim at a beach in Vieques, Puerto Rico. One of the bays on the island is famous for its bioluminescent plankton, which are slowly recovering after Hurricane Maria. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo for NPR

After Maria, One Of The World's Best Bioluminescent Bays Slowly Begins To Glow Again

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A child rides a bike by a house destroyed by Hurricane Maria in Vieques, Puerto Rico. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo for NPR

Puerto Rican Island 'Still In Crisis Mode' 3 Months After Maria

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Gregorio Velazquez Rivera, 81, sits inside an abandoned house he now occupies with his relatives after they lost their home to Hurricane Maria in Vieques, Puerto Rico. Ricardo Arduengo for NPR hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo for NPR

The active part of the landfill in Toa Baja is currently a hot, rancid, open dump. Federal regulations require trash piles to be covered daily with earth. But the site's supervisor says that's currently impossible. José Jiménez-Tirado for NPR hide caption

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José Jiménez-Tirado for NPR

After Maria, Puerto Rico Struggles Under The Weight Of Its Own Garbage

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