Maanvi Singh

Maanvi Singh

Story Archive

Photographer Lorenzo Vitturi assembled this collage of products sold at the street market of Lagos Island, Nigeria, including the T-shirt that gave him the title for his new book: "Money Must Be Made." Lorenzo Vitturi hide caption

toggle caption
Lorenzo Vitturi

The game Buffalo prompts players to think of people that buck stereotypes, and subliminally challenges those stereotypes in the process. Maanvi Singh for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Maanvi Singh for NPR

Fighting Bias With Board Games

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/575952575/576251688" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Nirma, 16, plays with her friends. She is married but still lives with her parents and talks to her husband on the phone sometimes. She is nervous about the duties she'll have to take on when she does move in with her husband. At the moment, she hopes to graduate high school and eventually become a doctor. Saumya Khandelwal hide caption

toggle caption
Saumya Khandelwal

Betsy Levy Paluck is a psychology professor at Princeton University. She ran a year-long experiment in Rwanda to see whether radio soap operas could be used to reduce prejudice. John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation hide caption

toggle caption
John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation