Maria Godoy Senior Editor, NPR Science Desk and Host of The Salt
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Maria Godoy 2016
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Maria Godoy

Senior Editor, NPR Science Desk and Host of The Salt

Maria Godoy is a senior editor with NPR's Science Desk and the host of NPR's food blog, The Salt. Maria covers the food beat with a wide lens, investigating everything from the health effects of caffeine to how our diets define our cultural and personal identities.

With her colleagues on the food team, Maria won the 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. The Salt was also awarded first place in the blog category from the Association of Food Journalists in 2013, and it won a Gracie Award for Outstanding Blog from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation in 2013.

Previously, Maria oversaw political, national, and business coverage for NPR.org. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with several awards, including two prestigious Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Silver Batons: one for coverage of the role of race in the 2008 presidential election, and another for a series about the sexual abuse of Native American women. The latter series was also awarded the Columbia Journalism School's Dart Award for excellence in reporting on trauma, and a Gracie Award.

In 2010, Maria and her colleagues were awarded a Gracie Award for her work on a series exploring the science of spirituality. She was also part of a team that won the 2007 Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Award for Excellence in Reporting on Drug and Alcohol Issues.

Maria was a 2008 Ethics fellow at the Poynter Institute. She joined NPR in 2003 as a digital news editor.

Born in Guatemala, Maria now lives in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., with her husband, two kids, and two fat and happy cats. She's a sucker for puns (and has won a couple of awards for her punning headlines).

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

"Equality cupcakes" by Georgetown Cupcakes are just one of several baked creations in support of same-sex marriage that were on display this week at the Chefs for Equality, a fundraising event for the Human Rights Campaign in Washington, D.C. Kelly Jo Smart/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kelly Jo Smart/NPR

United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta at the Delano grape workers strike in Delano, Calif., 1966. The strike set in motion the modern farmworkers movement. Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield

Guests attend a Refugees Welcome dinner at Lapis restaurant in Washington, D.C. The goals of the evening: to bring locals together with refugees in their community and to break barriers by breaking bread. Beck Harlan/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Beck Harlan/NPR
Courtesy of Wendy MacNaughton

An Illustrated Guide To Master The Elements Of Cooking — Without Recipes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529699099/530276483" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

For our interview, Risa, Naoko and Atsuko changed into their signature outfits: geometric-patterned dresses, designed by Atsuko, reminiscent of a Mondrian painting. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Ramen Rock: These Japanese Punk Legends Sing About Food

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529563157/530074799" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Some 55 percent of families with kids that receive food stamp benefits are earning wages. The problem is, those wages aren't enough to actually live on. Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images

Cloud eggs: It's not just Instagrammers who find them pretty. Chefs of the 17th century whipped them up, too. Then, as now, they were meant to impress. Maria Godoy/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Maria Godoy/NPR

Cloud Eggs: The Latest Instagram Food Fad Is Actually Centuries Old

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/529127751/529364548" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Chicken meat for sale at a market in Anhui province, China. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
VCG via Getty Images

Chinese Chicken Is Headed To America, But It's Really All About The Beef

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528139468/528198393" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S.-China Deal On Cooked Chicken Imports Raises Safety Concerns

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528166381/528166382" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A new report highlights victims of human trafficking in the food industry, from farm workers to restaurant bus staff, cooks and wait staff. Some victims are exploited for both sex and labor. Juanmonino/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Juanmonino/Getty Images