Maria Godoy Maria Godoy is a senior editor with NPR's Science Desk and the host of NPR's food blog, The Salt.
Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Maria Godoy

Allison Shelley/NPR
Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Maria Godoy

Senior Editor, NPR Science Desk, and Host, The Salt

Maria Godoy is a senior editor with NPR's Science Desk and the host of NPR's food blog, The Salt. Godoy covers the food beat with a wide lens, investigating everything from the health effects of caffeine to the environmental and cultural impact of what we eat.

Under Maria's leadership, The Salt was recognized as Publication of the Year in 2018 by the James Beard Foundation. With her colleagues on the food team, Godoy won the 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. The Salt was also awarded first place in the blog category from the Association of Food Journalists in 2013, and it won a Gracie Award for Outstanding Blog from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation in 2013.

Previously, Godoy oversaw political, national, and business coverage for NPR.org. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with several awards, including two prestigious Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Silver Batons: one for coverage of the role of race in the 2008 presidential election, and another for a series about the sexual abuse of Native American women. The latter series was also awarded the Columbia Journalism School's Dart Award for excellence in reporting on trauma, and a Gracie Award.

In 2010, Godoy and her colleagues were awarded a Gracie Award for her work on a series exploring the science of spirituality. She was also part of a team that won the 2007 Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Award for Excellence in Reporting on Drug and Alcohol Issues.

Godoy was a 2008 Ethics fellow at the Poynter Institute. She joined NPR in 2003 as a digital news editor.

Born in Guatemala, Godoy now lives in the suburbs of Washington, DC, with her husband and two kids. She's a sucker for puns (and has won a couple of awards for her punning headlines).

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How Body Positivity Can Lead To Better Health

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The serious inflammatory syndrome sending some children and teens to the hospital remains extremely uncommon, doctors say. But if your child spikes a high, persistent fever, and has severe abdominal pain with vomiting that doesn't make them feel better, call your doctor as a precaution. Sally Anscombe/Getty Images hide caption

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Mystery Inflammatory Syndrome In Kids And Teens Likely Linked To COVID-19

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Disease Experts Expand The List Of Coronavirus Symptoms

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Researcher Loretta Fernandez of Northeastern University wears a homemade face mask without and with an extra outer layer made from nylon stockings (right). The added nylon outer layer significantly boosted masks' ability to filter out small particles, her research found. Loretta Fernandez hide caption

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Loretta Fernandez

"Right now, there is no data on whether the UVA rays of the sun can inactivate this coronavirus," says Juan Leon, a virologist who focuses on environmental health at Emory University. ICHIRO/Getty Images hide caption

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If one person in the household is sick with COVID-19, everyone else in the home should consider themselves as possibly having an asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic infection, even if they feel fine, doctors say. sorbetto/Getty Images hide caption

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More Questions About Safe Grocery Shopping During The Epidemic

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Listener Questions About Safe Grocery Shopping During The Epidemic

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Going to the grocery store? Scientists share their advice about what to worry about and what not to. Katrina Wittkamp/Getty Images hide caption

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No, You Don't Need To Disinfect Your Groceries. But Here's How To Shop Safely

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Keeping Safe While Grocery Shopping During The Pandemic

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