Maria Godoy Maria Godoy is a senior editor and correspondent with NPR's Science Desk.
Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Maria Godoy

Oberlin College students worry Catholic directives could affect contraception access

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Getting contraception gets complicated for patients at Catholic hospitals

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Americans will soon be able to buy hearing aids without a prescription

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Hearing aids could be available over the counter as soon as October

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Plan B is one brand of the emergency contraceptive levonorgestrel, which works by delaying ovulation. It is sold over the counter at pharmacies, but is often kept in locked boxes or is only accessible by asking a pharmacist. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The 2021 study found that 32% of pharmacies did not have levonorgestrel, a hormone that can prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex, in stock at all, and of the pharmacies that did have it on the shelf, 70% of them kept it in a locked box. Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Seth Herald/AFP via Getty Images

Where to find emergency contraception now that Roe is gone

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Christina and James Summers were married for 17 years. Now, she's learning to navigate life without him. "Me and my husband really worked like a team," she says. "My teammate's not here to help me, so I'm really feeling a single mom vibe, just trying to get accustomed to this." Rosem Morton for NPR hide caption

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Rosem Morton for NPR

COVID took many in the prime of life, leaving families to pick up the pieces

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A mysterious form of hepatitis has appeared in more than 100 children

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Travelers sit in a waiting area at Rhode Island T.F. Green International Airport in Providence, R.I., on April 19. A federal judge's decision to strike down the federal mask mandate has left travelers to assess the risks of public transit on their own. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

To wear a mask, or not, on public transportation? Which is the right move for you?

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The CDC's mask mandate for public transportation has been reversed

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The FDA has authorized second booster shots for people over 50 and for some people who are immunocompromised. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Do I really need another booster? The answer depends on age, risk and timing

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Better ventilation means healthier students, but many schools can't afford to upgrade

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