Maria Godoy Maria Godoy is a senior editor and correspondent with NPR's Science Desk.
Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Maria Godoy

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Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Maria Godoy

Senior Editor/Correspondent, NPR Science Desk

Maria Godoy is a senior science and health editor and correspondent with NPR News. Her reporting can be heard across NPR's news shows and podcasts. She is also one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Previously, Godoy hosted NPR's food vertical, The Salt, where she covered the food beat with a wide lens — investigating everything from the health effects of caffeine to the environmental and cultural impact of what we eat.

Under Godoy's leadership, The Salt was recognized as Publication of the Year in 2018 by the James Beard Foundation. With her colleagues on the food team, Godoy won the 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. The Salt was also awarded first place in the blog category from the Association of Food Journalists in 2013, and it won a Gracie Award for Outstanding Blog from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation in 2013.

Previously, Godoy oversaw political, national, and business coverage for NPR.org. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with several awards, including two prestigious Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Silver Batons: one for coverage of the role of race in the 2008 presidential election, and another for a series about the sexual abuse of Native American women. The latter series was also awarded the Columbia Journalism School's Dart Award for excellence in reporting on trauma, and a Gracie Award.

In 2010, Godoy and her colleagues were awarded a Gracie Award for their work on a series exploring the science of spirituality. She was also part of a team that won the 2007 Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Award for Excellence in Reporting on Drug and Alcohol Issues.

Godoy was a 2008 Ethics fellow at the Poynter Institute. She joined NPR in 2003 as a digital news editor.

Born in Guatemala, Godoy now lives in the suburbs of Washington, DC, with her husband and two kids. She's a sucker for puns (and has won a couple of awards for her punning headlines).

Story Archive

With omicron so transmissible, experts warn everyone to up their mask game

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As omicron spreads, here's the best and most accurate way to use rapid antigen tests

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22 tips for 2022: If you want to eat less meat, spice is key

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A firefighter tests the seal on his N95 mask at the start of his shift in Glen Burnie, Md. With the spread of omicron, experts say to wear high-filtration respirators in public indoor spaces for the best protection. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Keeping safe from omicron during the holidays

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People line up to receive a rapid COVID-19 test in an agricultural community in Immokalee, Fla., where the poverty rate is over 40%. Partners in Health is working with the Coalition of Immokalee Workers to test, educate and vaccinate the community during the pandemic. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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A government digital poster encourages people to wear face masks to curb the spread of coronavirus in a bus stop in London, Friday, Dec. 17, 2021. Masking is a key way to help control the spread of the virus. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Katherine Streeter for NPR

Don't let omicron crash your holiday gathering. Here's how to keep your family safe

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A numbered tag hangs from the wing of a female California Condor at Grand Canyon National Park. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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TK splatchcock turkey Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan hide caption

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Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan

This Thanksgiving, let science help you roast a tastier turkey

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Kenji López-Alt says spatchcocking the turkey is the best way to overcome the common problem of light meat overcooking by the time dark meat is ready. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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This double-helix model of DNA is iconic, but not what you would see if you looked in your cells right now. BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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The secret history of DNA: Pus, fish sperm, life as we know it

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Scan Of The Brain Of A Patient Affected By Alzheimer's Disease Axial Section. The Food and Drug Administration approved aducanamab, the first drug to affect the underlying disease processes associated with Alzheimer's in June. BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Why Aduhelm, a new Alzheimer's treatment, isn't reaching many patients

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Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR

Housing and COVID: Why helping people pay rent can help fight the pandemic

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