Maria Godoy Senior Editor, NPR Science Desk and Host of The Salt.
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Maria Godoy
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Maria Godoy

Senior Editor, NPR Science Desk and Host of The Salt

Maria Godoy is a senior editor with NPR's Science Desk and the host of NPR's food blog, The Salt. Maria covers the food beat with a wide lens, investigating everything from the health effects of caffeine to how our diets define our cultural and personal identities.

With her colleagues on the food team, Maria won the 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. The Salt was also awarded first place in the blog category from the Association of Food Journalists in 2013, and it won a Gracie Award for Outstanding Blog from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation in 2013.

Previously, Maria oversaw political, national, and business coverage for NPR.org. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with several awards, including two prestigious Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Silver Batons: one for coverage of the role of race in the 2008 presidential election, and another for a series about the sexual abuse of Native American women. The latter series was also awarded the Columbia Journalism School's Dart Award for excellence in reporting on trauma, and a Gracie Award.

In 2010, Maria and her colleagues were awarded a Gracie Award for her work on a series exploring the science of spirituality. She was also part of a team that won the 2007 Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Award for Excellence in Reporting on Drug and Alcohol Issues.

Maria was a 2008 Ethics fellow at the Poynter Institute. She joined NPR in 2003 as a digital news editor.

Born in Guatemala, Maria now lives in the suburbs of Washington, D.C., with her husband, two kids, and two fat and happy cats. She's a sucker for puns (and has won a couple of awards for her punning headlines).

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Story Archive

Tim Ma prepares a duck confit salad at his restaurant, Kyirisan, in Washington, D.C. Ma says being mindful about reducing food waste is an integral part of his philosophy in the kitchen — not just for environmental reasons but also for profitability. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

A customer approaches the window at Saartj, a pop-up food stall in New Orleans running a social experiment. Customers of color are charged the listed $12 price for a meal. White customers are told about the income gap in New Orleans between whites and African-Americans and asked whether they want to pay $30 instead, a price that reflects the gap. Deji Osinulu hide caption

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Deji Osinulu

The USDA has been providing food aid in the form of canned, shelf-stable nonperishables to Native Americans for decades. Shana Novak/Getty Images hide caption

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Shana Novak/Getty Images

How Might Trump's Food Box Plan Affect Health? Native Americans Know All Too Well

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Rebecka Ortiz offers her daughter a pasta sample at the store where she was using her food stamps to stock up on food for her family in Woonsocket, R.I. The Trump administration is proposing drastic changes in the "food stamp" program, now called SNAP. People getting that aid would lose much of their ability to choose the food they buy. Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Georgia Gilmore adjusts her hat for photographers in 1956 during the bus boycott trial of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in Montgomery, Ala. She testified: "When you pay your fare and they count the money, they don't know the Negro money from white money." AP hide caption

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AP

Meet The Fearless Cook Who Secretly Fed — And Funded — The Civil Rights Movement

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The James Beard Awards are known as the Oscars of the food world. Now several past winners, including chefs Mario Batali and John Besh, face allegations of sexual harassment. This year, the awards committee is asking judges to consider character and culture in nominating chefs and restaurants for the awards. Thomas Barwick/Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas Barwick/Getty Images

James Beard Awards Urge Voters To Consider Both Cuisine And Character

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Paige Vickers for NPR

Resolved To Lose Weight? We Gave Food-Tracking Apps A Try

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Chef Massimo Bottura creates a meal from Thanksgiving leftovers in NPR's kitchen. "The leftover is a big problem if you don't have a vision, if you don't have the knowledge of what you can do," he says. Above, he checks the breadcrumbs to make sure they're dry and fine enough to turn into a pasta called passatelli. Becky Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Becky Harlan/NPR

Less Waste, More Taste: A Master Chef Reimagines Thanksgiving Leftovers

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"Equality cupcakes" by Georgetown Cupcakes are just one of several baked creations in support of same-sex marriage that were on display this week at the Chefs for Equality, a fundraising event for the Human Rights Campaign in Washington, D.C. Kelly Jo Smart/NPR hide caption

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Kelly Jo Smart/NPR

United Farm Workers leader Dolores Huerta at the Delano grape workers strike in Delano, Calif., 1966. The strike set in motion the modern farmworkers movement. Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield hide caption

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Jon Lewis/Courtesy of LeRoy Chatfield

Guests attend a Refugees Welcome dinner at Lapis restaurant in Washington, D.C. The goals of the evening: to bring locals together with refugees in their community and to break barriers by breaking bread. Beck Harlan/NPR hide caption

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Beck Harlan/NPR
Courtesy of Wendy MacNaughton

An Illustrated Guide To Master The Elements Of Cooking — Without Recipes

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For our interview, Risa, Naoko and Atsuko changed into their signature outfits: geometric-patterned dresses, designed by Atsuko, reminiscent of a Mondrian painting. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Ramen Rock: These Japanese Punk Legends Sing About Food

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Some 55 percent of families with kids that receive food stamp benefits are earning wages. The problem is, those wages aren't enough to actually live on. Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Whitney Hayward/Press Herald/Getty Images