Maria Godoy Maria Godoy is a senior editor and correspondent with NPR's Science Desk.
Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Maria Godoy

Allison Shelley/NPR
Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Maria Godoy

Senior Editor/Correspondent, NPR Science Desk

Maria Godoy is a senior science and health editor and correspondent with NPR News. Her reporting can be heard across NPR's news shows and podcasts. She is also one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Previously, Godoy hosted NPR's food vertical, The Salt, where she covered the food beat with a wide lens — investigating everything from the health effects of caffeine to the environmental and cultural impact of what we eat.

Under Godoy's leadership, The Salt was recognized as Publication of the Year in 2018 by the James Beard Foundation. With her colleagues on the food team, Godoy won the 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. The Salt was also awarded first place in the blog category from the Association of Food Journalists in 2013, and it won a Gracie Award for Outstanding Blog from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation in 2013.

Previously, Godoy oversaw political, national, and business coverage for NPR.org. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with several awards, including two prestigious Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Silver Batons: one for coverage of the role of race in the 2008 presidential election, and another for a series about the sexual abuse of Native American women. The latter series was also awarded the Columbia Journalism School's Dart Award for excellence in reporting on trauma, and a Gracie Award.

In 2010, Godoy and her colleagues were awarded a Gracie Award for their work on a series exploring the science of spirituality. She was also part of a team that won the 2007 Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Award for Excellence in Reporting on Drug and Alcohol Issues.

Godoy was a 2008 Ethics fellow at the Poynter Institute. She joined NPR in 2003 as a digital news editor.

Born in Guatemala, Godoy now lives in the suburbs of Washington, DC, with her husband and two kids. She's a sucker for puns (and has won a couple of awards for her punning headlines).

Story Archive

TK splatchcock turkey Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan hide caption

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Derek Campanile / Dad With A Pan

This Thanksgiving, let science help you roast a tastier turkey

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Kenji López-Alt says spatchcocking the turkey is the best way to overcome the common problem of light meat overcooking by the time dark meat is ready. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im

This double-helix model of DNA is iconic, but not what you would see if you looked in your cells right now. BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty

The secret history of DNA: Pus, fish sperm, life as we know it

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Scan Of The Brain Of A Patient Affected By Alzheimer's Disease Axial Section. The Food and Drug Administration approved aducanamab, the first drug to affect the underlying disease processes associated with Alzheimer's in June. BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty hide caption

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Why Aduhelm, a new Alzheimer's treatment, isn't reaching many patients

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Erica Cuellar, her husband and her daughter moved in with her father in his home early in the pandemic, after she lost her job. She and her husband were worried they wouldn't be able to afford the rent on their house in Houston with only one income. In July 2020, the whole family tested positive for the coronavirus. Michael Starghill for NPR hide caption

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Michael Starghill for NPR

Housing and COVID: Why helping people pay rent can help fight the pandemic

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When confronted with a spider-like 3-D model, jumping spiders freeze and back away slowly, especially if the model has eyes. Daniela Roessler hide caption

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Daniela Roessler
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The roots of mangrove trees grow above and below the water's edge. Dulyanut Swdp/Getty Images hide caption

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The Mighty Mangrove

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Usha Lee McFarling from STAT reports that an increase in funding and attention to health disparity research means some researchers of color who've long been in the field are being pushed aside. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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The Science And Policy Behind The Decision To Vaccinate Younger Children

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HOUSTON, TEXAS - AUGUST 23: Students at the Xavier Academy, like many schools around Houston, are required to wear masks. Staff and faculty have been vaccinated and 90% of students in attendance have also been vaccinated. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Elementary School COVID Outbreak Shows Why Layers Of Safety Precautions Are Necessary

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First-graders listen to the interim superintendent of the Los Angeles Unified School District, Megan Reilly, read a book at Normont Elementary School in Harbor City on Aug. 16, the first day of school. Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group via Getty Images