Maria Godoy Maria Godoy is a senior editor with NPR's Science Desk and the host of NPR's food blog, The Salt.
Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Maria Godoy

Allison Shelley/NPR
Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Maria Godoy

Senior Editor, NPR Science Desk, and Host, The Salt

Maria Godoy is a senior editor with NPR's Science Desk and the host of NPR's food blog, The Salt. Godoy covers the food beat with a wide lens, investigating everything from the health effects of caffeine to the environmental and cultural impact of what we eat.

Under Maria's leadership, The Salt was recognized as Publication of the Year in 2018 by the James Beard Foundation. With her colleagues on the food team, Godoy won the 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. The Salt was also awarded first place in the blog category from the Association of Food Journalists in 2013, and it won a Gracie Award for Outstanding Blog from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation in 2013.

Previously, Godoy oversaw political, national, and business coverage for NPR.org. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with several awards, including two prestigious Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Silver Batons: one for coverage of the role of race in the 2008 presidential election, and another for a series about the sexual abuse of Native American women. The latter series was also awarded the Columbia Journalism School's Dart Award for excellence in reporting on trauma, and a Gracie Award.

In 2010, Godoy and her colleagues were awarded a Gracie Award for her work on a series exploring the science of spirituality. She was also part of a team that won the 2007 Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Award for Excellence in Reporting on Drug and Alcohol Issues.

Godoy was a 2008 Ethics fellow at the Poynter Institute. She joined NPR in 2003 as a digital news editor.

Born in Guatemala, Godoy now lives in the suburbs of Washington, DC, with her husband, two kids, and two fat and happy cats. She's a sucker for puns (and has won a couple of awards for her punning headlines).

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An example of one of the study's ultra-processed lunches consists of quesadillas, refried beans and diet lemonade. Participants on this diet ate an average of 508 calories more per day and gained an average of 2 pounds over two weeks. Hall et al./Cell Metabolism hide caption

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Hall et al./Cell Metabolism

It's Not Just Salt, Sugar, Fat: Study Finds Ultra-Processed Foods Drive Weight Gain

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If you choose to try to lose weight, make changes that you can live with for the long haul. Shannon Wright for NPR hide caption

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Shannon Wright for NPR

Biology's A B*tch: 5 Reasons It's So Hard To Keep Weight Off

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Onwuachi cooks in the kitchen of his D.C. restaurant, Kith and Kin. His food encompasses a range of African, Caribbean, African-American and other influences. Noah Fortson/NPR hide caption

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Chef's Memoir Tackles What It's Like To Be Young, Gifted And Black In Fine Dining

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Competitors Sink Their Teeth Into The Meatless-Meat Industry

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Focusing less on the meat-free or health aspects of plant-based dishes, like this jackfruit burger — and more on their flavor, mouthfeel and provenance — could go a long way toward getting meat lovers to choose these options more often. That's according to research by the World Resources Institute's Better Buying Lab in conjunction with food chains, marketers and behavioral economists. Westend61/Getty Images hide caption

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How To Get Meat Eaters To Eat More Plant-Based Foods? Make Their Mouths Water

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For passionate football fans, it's not just bragging rights on the line Sunday: Waistlines are too. Research suggests whether your team wins or loses can alter how you perceive the taste of food, and how much you eat, even the day after. Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr hide caption

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Leif Parsons for NPR; Source: whologwhy/Flickr

"Feeling better isn't just this selfish, hedonic thing — it actually is fuel. I consider energy from taking care of yourself as essential fuel for the things that matter most in our lives," says Michelle Segar, a psychologist at the University of Michigan who studies how we sustain healthy behaviors like exercise. Saviour Giyorges / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm Premium hide caption

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From Couch Potato To Fitness Buff: How I Learned To Love Exercise

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As cities and companies — including Starbucks — move to oust straws in a bid to reduce pollution, people with disabilities say they're losing access to a necessary, lifesaving tool. Thn Rocn Khosit Rath Phachr Sukh /EyeEm via Getty Images hide caption

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Thn Rocn Khosit Rath Phachr Sukh /EyeEm via Getty Images

Why People With Disabilities Want Bans On Plastic Straws To Be More Flexible

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Want Your Child To Eat (Almost) Everything? There Is A Way

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