Maria Godoy Maria Godoy is a senior editor and correspondent with NPR's Science Desk.
Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Maria Godoy

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Maria Godoy at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., May 22, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Maria Godoy

Senior Editor/Correspondent, NPR Science Desk

Maria Godoy is a senior science and health editor and correspondent with NPR News. Her reporting can be heard across NPR's news shows and podcasts. She is also one of the hosts of NPR's Life Kit.

Previously, Godoy hosted NPR's food vertical, The Salt, where she covered the food beat with a wide lens — investigating everything from the health effects of caffeine to the environmental and cultural impact of what we eat.

Under Godoy's leadership, The Salt was recognized as Publication of the Year in 2018 by the James Beard Foundation. With her colleagues on the food team, Godoy won the 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. The Salt was also awarded first place in the blog category from the Association of Food Journalists in 2013, and it won a Gracie Award for Outstanding Blog from the Alliance for Women in Media Foundation in 2013.

Previously, Godoy oversaw political, national, and business coverage for NPR.org. Her work as part of NPR's reporting teams has been recognized with several awards, including two prestigious Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia University Silver Batons: one for coverage of the role of race in the 2008 presidential election, and another for a series about the sexual abuse of Native American women. The latter series was also awarded the Columbia Journalism School's Dart Award for excellence in reporting on trauma, and a Gracie Award.

In 2010, Godoy and her colleagues were awarded a Gracie Award for their work on a series exploring the science of spirituality. She was also part of a team that won the 2007 Nancy Dickerson Whitehead Award for Excellence in Reporting on Drug and Alcohol Issues.

Godoy was a 2008 Ethics fellow at the Poynter Institute. She joined NPR in 2003 as a digital news editor.

Born in Guatemala, Godoy now lives in the suburbs of Washington, DC, with her husband and two kids. She's a sucker for puns (and has won a couple of awards for her punning headlines).

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A medical worker at South Shore University Hospital gets ready to administer the newly available Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine in Bay Shore, N.Y., Wednesday. Clinical research found it to be 85% effective in preventing severe disease four weeks after vaccination, and it has demonstrated promising indications of protection against a couple of concerning variants of the coronavirus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Got Questions About Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 Vaccine? We Have Answers

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A reader asks: I want to have a private cuddle session with some goats but am concerned that the goats may have cuddled with other people. What's the COVID-19 risk? Note: The goat and human in the photo above are part of the same pandemic pod. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Two Masks Are Better Than One, CDC Says

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After a small study raised concerns about the effectiveness of the AstraZeneca vaccine against the variant in South Africa, the country put its AstraZeneca vaccine plans on hold. "It is time, unfortunately, for us to recalibrate our expectation of COVID-19 vaccines," said Shabir Madhi, professor of vaccinology at the University of Witwatersrand, shown above at a vaccine trial facility. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

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Jerome Delay/AP

Tie the ear loops close to the edges of the mask and tuck in the side pleats to minimizes gaps (left). Or use a hair clip to hold the ear loops tightly at the back of the head to achieve a tighter seal. Michele Abercrombie/NPR hide caption

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Michele Abercrombie/NPR

Some Health Experts Suggest Double Masking As New Coronavirus Variants Spread

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7 Tips To Get Back On Your Home Exercise Game

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An official has a blood pressure test before receiving the Sinovac vaccine against the Covid-19 coronavirus at Meuraxa Hospital in Banda Aceh on January 15, 2021. Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Chaideer Mahyuddin/AFP via Getty Images

Data Challenges Efficacy Of Vaccine Made By Chinese Company

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In recent years, some in the medical community have started questioning the use of race in kidney medicine, arguing its use could perpetuate health disparities. FG Trade/Getty Images hide caption

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Should Black People Get Race Adjustments In Kidney Medicine?

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In U.S. Cities, The Health Effects Of Past Housing Discrimination Are Plain To See

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Biden Advisory Board Co-Chair Says Addressing Health Disparities Will Be A Key Focus

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The CDC says that when it comes to cloth masks, multiple layers made of higher thread counts do a better job of protecting the wearer. Michael Stewart/GC Images hide caption

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