Maureen Pao Maureen Pao is an editor, producer and reporter on NPR's Digital News team.
Maureen Pao, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
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Maureen Pao

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Maureen Pao, photographed for NPR, 17 January 2019, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Maureen Pao

Producer, Digital News

Maureen Pao is an editor, producer and reporter on NPR's Digital News team. In her current role, she is lead digital editor and producer for All Things Considered. Her primary responsibility is coordinating, producing and editing high-impact online components for complex, multipart show projects and host field reporting.

She also identifies and reports original stories for online, on-air and social platforms, on subjects ranging from childhood vaccinations during the pandemic, baby boxes and the high cost of childcare to Peppa Pig in China and the Underground Railroad in Maryland. Most memorable interview? No question: a one-on-one conversation with Dolly Parton.

In early 2020, Pao spent three months reporting local news at member station WAMU as part of an NPR exchange program. In 2014, she was chosen to participate in the East-West Center's Asia Pacific Journalism Fellowship program, during which she reported stories from Taiwan and Singapore.

Previously, she served as the first dedicated digital producer for international news at NPR.

Before coming to NPR, Pao worked as a travel editor at USA TODAY and as a reporter and editor in Hong Kong and Taiwan.

She's a graduate of the University of Virginia and earned a master's in journalism from the University of Michigan. Originally from South Carolina, she can drawl on command and talk about dumplings all day. She lives with her family in Washington, D.C.

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Gettysburg College has ordered all of its students to remain at their residences and moved all classes online in measures that began Tuesday. John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images

Harris County Public Health contact tracers are seen at work as they try to help stop the spread of the coronavirus outbreak in Houston, Texas, on July 22. Adrees Latif/Reuters hide caption

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Adrees Latif/Reuters

California And Texas Health Officials: Mistrust A Major Hurdle For Contact Tracers

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Due to the low COVID-19 infection rates across the state, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Friday that all New York school districts may reopen this fall. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Texas Tech women's basketball coach Marlene Stollings has been fired after players accused her of fostering a culture of abuse that led to an exodus from the program. Brad Tollefson/AP hide caption

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Brad Tollefson/AP

LouAnn Woodward, who leads the University of Mississippi Medical Center, supports a statewide mask mandate. But she says state leaders are "in a pickle," based on medical advice against popular opposition. Joe Ellis/UMMC Photography hide caption

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Joe Ellis/UMMC Photography

Mississippi On Track To Become No. 1 State For New Coronavirus Cases Per Capita

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San Francisco Mayor London Breed speaks to a group protesting police racism outside City Hall on June 1. On Friday she announced plans to divert $120 million from the city's police to efforts that address inequities in the Black community. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam, shown here arriving for a news conference in Hong Kong on Friday, is delaying the region's legislative elections by a year. Kin Cheung/AP hide caption

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Kin Cheung/AP

Graffiti on a wall on La Brea Ave. in Los Angeles, Calif. asking for rent forgiveness in May. This week, the city of Los Angeles rolled out a renters relief program to provide more than $100 million in assistance. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

Los Angeles Launches $103 Million Program To Offer Relief To Renters

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Roughly 40% of women surveyed by the Guttmacher Institute said they changed their plans on when to have children, or how many to have. PeopleImages/Getty Images hide caption

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Survey: Women Are Rethinking Having Kids As They Face Pandemic Challenges

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Mayor Quinton Lucas talks to demonstrators during a rally in Kansas City, Mo., on June 5, to protest the death of George Floyd. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Charlie Riedel/AP

Mayor Of Kansas City, Mo., Wants To Eliminate Marijuana Offenses

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The human need to connect means offices will likely survive the pandemic, but in an altered state. Shannon Fagan/Getty Images hide caption

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No More Watercooler Talk And Other Ways Offices Will Adapt To The Pandemic

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San Diego State University is among the 23 campuses of the California State University system that will hold their fall semesters online as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Mike Blake/Reuters hide caption

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Mike Blake/Reuters

Cal State Chancellor Says Virtual Classes Can Still Lead To 'Lifetime Of Opportunity'

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Seventeen bodies were found at the Andover Subacute and Rehabilitation Center in Andover, N.J. in April. New Jersey Attorney General Gurbir Grewal is investigating misconduct at nursing homes in the state. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

New Jersey Investigates State's Nursing Homes, Hotbed Of COVID-19 Fatalities

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Doctors are urging parents to keep all their child's vaccinations up to date — now, more than ever. Karl Tapales/Getty Images hide caption

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Karl Tapales/Getty Images

Don't Skip Your Child's Well Check: Delays In Vaccines Could Add Up To Big Problems

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