Meredith Rizzo Meredith Rizzo is a visuals editor and art director on NPR's Science desk.
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Meredith Rizzo

Meredith Rizzo

Editor, Science Desk

Meredith Rizzo is a visuals editor and art director on NPR's Science desk. She produces multimedia stories that illuminate science topics through visual reporting, animation, illustration, photography and video. In her time on the Science desk, she's reported from Hong Kong during the early days of the pandemic, photographed the experiences of the first patient to receive an experimental CRISPR treatment for sickle cell disease and covered post-wildfire issues from Australia to California. In 2021, she worked with a team on NPR's Joy Generator, a randomized ideas machine for ways to tap into positive emotions following a year of life in the pandemic. In 2019, she photographed, reported and produced another interactive visual guide exploring how the shape and size of many common grocery store plastics affect their recyclability.

Her video work has included science explainer videos on the physics of bullets to how long you can be contagious with the flu, and an animated series on the science of invention. As an art director, she helped build NPR's network of freelance illustrators and animators, growing the community through NPR's Illustration Tumblr. She has also art directed for three seasons of the NPR podcast Invisibilia.

Rizzo holds a master's degree in New Media Photojournalism from Corcoran College of Art + Design and a bachelor's degree in photography from Wolverhampton University in the U.K. Prior to joining NPR in 2013, she photographed artifacts from the Library of Congress' collections, contributing to a public archive of more than 150,000 images over four years.

Story Archive

Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant. Annotations by NPR.

Video analysis reveals Russian attack on Ukrainian nuclear plant veered near disaster

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The annual town meeting in North Andover, Mass., which dates back to 1646, was held outside on June 16 on a high school football field to help keep participants a safe distance from each other. Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Davis/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

In 2009, Australia's deadliest bushfires on record destroyed Kinglake, a town just over an hour's drive northeast of Melbourne. The disaster had long-term effects on families. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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The Fire, The Virus, The Violence: Australia And The Lessons Of Natural Disasters

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In Manhattan, Isiah Turner isn't particularly worried about the outbreak. Other than continuously washing his hands and cleaning, he says, "it's just another day." (Right) Ali Sky isn't worried about her own health but says, "I'm really worried about my husband." Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Sell Or Stay? Australia's Fire Zone Experiment

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A person walks through a shopping plaza in the Mong Kok neighborhood of Hong Kong. Fears of catching the virus have meant fewer people in public spaces. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Bushfires followed by intense rain can cause unsettled sediment and debris to contaminate local water reservoirs. Melbourne's water authority invested in catchments to combat this threat, though scientists are still trying to understand when and how these debris flows occur. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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