Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk.
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Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Reporter, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk. She reports for the radio and the Web for NPR's global health and development blog, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, drug development, and trends in global health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2015, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh reported on the extreme prejudices faced by young women in Nepal when they're menstruating. Their story was the second most popular one on the NPR website in 2015 and contributed to the NPR series on 15-year-old girls around the world, which won two Gracie Awards.

As a science journalist, Doucleff has reported on a broad range of topics, from vaccination fears and the microbiome to beer biophysics and dog psychology.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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Gelmy, 9, and sister Alexa, 4, climbing trees in the backyard of their family home in the Yucatan Peninsula. Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR hide caption

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A Lost Secret: How To Get Kids To Pay Attention

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Why It's Difficult For Viruses To Turn In To Deadly Pandemics

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Maria de los Angeles Tun Burgos with daughters Angela, 12, and Gelmy, 9, in their family home in a Maya village in Yucat√°n, Mexico. Adriana Zehbrauskas for NPR hide caption

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Secrets Of A Maya Supermom: What Parenting Books Don't Tell You

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Patients are treated at an Army ward in Kansas during the influenza epidemic of 1918. About 675,000 Americans died of the flu known as "la grippe." NYPL/Science Source/Getty Images hide caption

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A man bends with a beautiful hip hinge in Puerta Vallarta, Mexico. Courtesy of Jean Couch hide caption

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Lost Art Of Bending Over: How Other Cultures Spare Their Spines

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Influenza covers its shell with two types of accessories: the H spike, blue, and the N spike, red. Here the flu particle is sliced open to show its genetic material. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases

In August 2014, Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, talked with Doctors Without Borders staff during a visit to an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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