Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Michaeleen Doucleff 2016 square
Stories By

Michaeleen Doucleff

Sanjit Das/NPR
Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Correspondent, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff, PhD, is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. For nearly a decade, she has been reporting for the radio and the web for NPR's global health outlet, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, cross-cultural parenting, and women and children's health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2019, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh produced a story about how Inuit parents teach children to control their anger. That story was the most popular one on NPR.org for the year; altogether readers have spent more than 16 years worth of time reading it.

In 2021, Doucleff published a book, called Hunt, Gather, Parent, stemming from her reporting at NPR. That book became a New York Times bestseller.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a bachelor degree in biology from Caltech, a doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

Story Archive

What science has to say about so-called COVID superdodgers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1125525805/1125525806" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Do some people have built-in protection against a COVID infection? Laura Gao for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Laura Gao for NPR

So you haven't caught COVID yet. Does that mean you're a superdodger?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1121599445/1125679392" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tennis great Rafael Nadal of Spain might think twice about shaking off his beads of perspiration. It turns out that sweat leads to a surprising health benefit. Matthew Stockman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Matthew Stockman/Getty Images

Why stinky sweat is good for you

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1119228689/1119973930" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Facing a monkeypox vaccines shortage, the U.S. is pursuing a new dosing strategy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1118271883/1118274596" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A health-care worker prepares to administer a free monkeypox vaccine in Wilton Manors, Florida. The question: Can vaccination slow the outbreak? Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The doctor to detect the monkeypox outbreak tried to warn about how it was spreading

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1117762218/1117762219" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A person arrives for a monkeypox vaccination at a New York health care center. Eduardo Munoz/REUTERS hide caption

toggle caption
Eduardo Munoz/REUTERS

Monkeypox: The myths, misconceptions — and facts — about how you catch it

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1115859376/1115859377" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Can the monkeypox outbreak be stopped? Some experts say it's too late

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114613208/1114613209" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Dimie Ogoina, professor of medicine and infectious diseases at Niger Delta University in Nigeria. Over the past few years, he has tried to warn health officials that the monkeypox virus had changed, but few listened. Right: The monkeypox isolation ward of Niger Delta University Teaching Hospital in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Dr. Dimie Ogoina hide caption

toggle caption
Dr. Dimie Ogoina

He discovered the origin of the monkeypox outbreak — and tried to warn the world

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1114183886/1114183887" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People line up outside of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on June 23, as the city makes vaccines available to residents possibly exposed to monkeypox. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Monkeypox outbreak in U.S. is bigger than the CDC reports. Testing is 'abysmal'

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107416457/1107484190" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Problems with monkeypox testing mean the outbreak may be far bigger than reported

  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107151098/1107151099" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Aerial view of the Beckton Sewage Treatment Works in London. Between February and May, U.K. scientists found several samples containing closely related versions of the polio virus in wastewater at the plant. mwmbwls/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
mwmbwls/Flickr

Monkeypox cases are going undetected or misdiagnosed

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1103372564/1103372565" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript