Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
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When COVID-19 first broke out in Wuhan, scientists tracked a large number of the cases to the Huanan Seafood Market in Wuhan. Above: The Wuhan Hygiene Emergency Response Team departs the market on Jan. 11, 2020, after it had been shut down to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

Encouraging Collaboration Early On Can Lead To More Helpful Children Later

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The Origins Of COVID-19? WHO Report Points To A Bat After All

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World Health Organization investigative team member Peter Daszak (shown here during a trip to China in February) tells NPR that the group's report calls for additional research on farms that breed exotic animals in southern China. Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP via Getty Images

A researcher with Franceville International Medical Research Centre collects bats in a net on November 25, 2020 inside a cave in Gabon. Scientists are looking for potential sources for a possible next coronavirus pandemic. Steeve Jordan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Steeve Jordan/AFP via Getty Images

Next Pandemic: Scientists Fear Another Coronavirus Could Jump From Animals To Humans

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Understanding Where Coronaviruses Come From And How They Enter Humans

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The author's daughter, Rosy, at age 2 as she does dishes — voluntarily. Getting her involved in chores did lead to the kitchen being flooded and dishes being broken. But she is still eager to help. Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

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Are We Raising Unhelpful, Bossy Kids? Here's The Fix

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A health officer in a protective suit collects a sample from a package of imported frozen food for a coronavirus rapid test at a wholesale market in China. Wu Zheng/VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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Wu Zheng/VCG via Getty Images

Can Frozen Food Spread The Coronavirus?

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Can COVID-19 Be Transmitted Through Frozen Food Shipments?

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World Health Organization Finishes Investigation Into Origins Of COVID-19

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An illustration of the variant found in the United Kingdom. To infect a cell, the virus's spike protein (red) has to bind to a receptor on the cell's surface (blue). Mutations help the virus bind more tightly. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Extraordinary Patient Offers Surprising Clues To Origins Of Coronavirus Variants

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Indigenous health care workers treat patients last week at a campaign hospital set up in the Parque das Tribos neighborhood of Manaus, Brazil. Oxygen shortages at hospitals in Brazil's Amazon prompted authorities to airlift patients to other states. Jonne Roriz/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonne Roriz/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Moderna Is Working On Booster Shot To Protect Against COVID-19 Variant

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Workers check oxygen tanks at a hospital in Manaus, Brazil. Severe oxygen shortages as a second coronavirus wave is surging have prompted local authorities to airlift patients to other parts of Brazil. Jonne Roriz/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonne Roriz/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

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