Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
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Michaeleen Doucleff

Protests raise questions about why China is still relying on COVID restrictions

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China is doing many millions of tests a day to uncover cases of COVID-19 — part of its zero-COVID policy. Above: People line up for nucleic acid tests to detect the virus at a public testing site on Nov. 17 in Beijing. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Why China's 'zero COVID' policy is finally faltering

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Black Death survivors gave descendants a genetic advantage — but with a cost

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Researchers extracted DNA from the remains of people buried in the East Smithfield plague pits, which were used for mass burials in 1348 and 1349. Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) hide caption

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Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA)

Black Death survivors gave their descendants a genetic advantage — but with a cost

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Studies show that monkeypox isn't easy to catch from respiratory droplets or contaminated objects. It's one of the reasons that the virus hasn't spread more widely in the U.S. AP hide caption

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AP

Monkeypox cases in the U.S. are way down — can the virus be eliminated?

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Monkeypox cases in the U.S. have been falling since a peak in early August

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What science has to say about so-called COVID superdodgers

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Do some people have built-in protection against a COVID infection? Laura Gao for NPR hide caption

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Laura Gao for NPR

So you haven't caught COVID yet. Does that mean you're a superdodger?

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Tennis great Rafael Nadal of Spain might think twice about shaking off his beads of perspiration. It turns out that sweat leads to a surprising health benefit. Matthew Stockman/Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Stockman/Getty Images

Why stinky sweat is good for you

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Facing a monkeypox vaccines shortage, the U.S. is pursuing a new dosing strategy

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A health-care worker prepares to administer a free monkeypox vaccine in Wilton Manors, Florida. The question: Can vaccination slow the outbreak? Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

The doctor to detect the monkeypox outbreak tried to warn about how it was spreading

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A person arrives for a monkeypox vaccination at a New York health care center. Eduardo Munoz/REUTERS hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/REUTERS

Monkeypox: The myths, misconceptions — and facts — about how you catch it

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Can the monkeypox outbreak be stopped? Some experts say it's too late

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