Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk.
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Michaeleen Doucleff

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Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Reporter, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk. She reports for the radio and the Web for NPR's global health and development blog, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, drug development, and trends in global health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2015, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh reported on the extreme prejudices faced by young women in Nepal when they're menstruating. Their story was the second most popular one on the NPR website in 2015 and contributed to the NPR series on 15-year-old girls around the world, which won two Gracie Awards.

As a science journalist, Doucleff has reported on a broad range of topics, from vaccination fears and the microbiome to beer biophysics and dog psychology.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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Workers check oxygen tanks at a hospital in Manaus, Brazil. Severe oxygen shortages as a second coronavirus wave is surging have prompted local authorities to airlift patients to other parts of Brazil. Jonne Roriz/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonne Roriz/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

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Scientists Worry About Coronavirus Variant Spreading In Brazil

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A coronavirus variant that is thought to be more contagious was detected in the United States in Elbert County, Colo., not far from this testing site in Parker, Colo. The variant has been detected in several U.S. states. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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What Happens If U.K. Variant Of The Coronavirus Spreads In The U.S.?

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Volunteers and health officials hold a dry run for the coronavirus vaccine at a hospital in Allahabad, India. There's concern that drug patents will keep lower income countries from getting the doses they need in a timely fashion. Sanjay Kanojia/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sanjay Kanojia/AFP via Getty Images

What Will It Take To End The COVID-19 Pandemic?

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Why Viruses Mutate: Breaking Down The New Coronavirus Variant

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The image depicts the coronavirus binding to a human cell. The variant identified in the United Kingdom has a mutation known to increase how tightly the virus binds to human cells. Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library via Getty Images hide caption

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Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

How Worried Should We Be About The New U.K. Coronavirus Variant?

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A poster about the new, fast-spreading variant of the coronavirus warns some Britons to stay home. The sign is displayed near King's Cross railway station in London. Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Alden/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Coronavirus Variant In England Causes International Concern

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Dr. Chizoba Barbara Wonodi is director of Johns Hopkins University's International Vaccine Access Center for Nigeria. Dr. Chizoba Barbara Wonodi hide caption

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Dr. Chizoba Barbara Wonodi

Developed Countries Plan To Start Vaccination Soon. What About The Rest Of The World?

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A female Aedes aegypti mosquito feeds on human skin. James Gathany/CDC/Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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The pharmaceutical company Pfizer, and its partner BioNTech said their experimental vaccine against COVID-19 appears to work — and work quite well. Matt Stone/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Why Poorer Countries Aren't Likely To Get The Pfizer Vaccine Any Time Soon

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