Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
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Michaeleen Doucleff

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Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Correspondent, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff, PhD, is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. For nearly a decade, she has been reporting for the radio and the web for NPR's global health outlet, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, cross-cultural parenting, and women and children's health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2019, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh produced a story about how Inuit parents teach children to control their anger. That story was the most popular one on NPR.org for the year; altogether readers have spent more than 16 years worth of time reading it.

In 2021, Doucleff published a book, called Hunt, Gather, Parent, stemming from her reporting at NPR. That book became a New York Times bestseller.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a bachelor degree in biology from Caltech, a doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

Story Archive

People line up outside of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene on June 23, as the city makes vaccines available to residents possibly exposed to monkeypox. Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Tayfun Coskun/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

Monkeypox outbreak in U.S. is bigger than the CDC reports. Testing is 'abysmal'

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Problems with monkeypox testing mean the outbreak may be far bigger than reported

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Aerial view of the Beckton Sewage Treatment Works in London. Between February and May, U.K. scientists found several samples containing closely related versions of the polio virus in wastewater at the plant. mwmbwls/Flickr hide caption

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mwmbwls/Flickr

Monkeypox cases are going undetected or misdiagnosed

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Above: a monkeypox lesion. The lesions in cases that are part of the 2022 outbreak are often first seen on genitalia or the anus. Spread to other parts of the body is possible but doesn't always occur. U.K. Health Security Agency hide caption

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U.K. Health Security Agency

Smallpox vaccines being administered in Paris in 1941. When the disease was eradicated and vaccination came to a stop, that created an opening for its virus relative monkeypox. Roger Viollet via Getty Images hide caption

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Roger Viollet via Getty Images

Scientists warned us about monkeypox in 1988. Here's why they were right.

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Symptoms of the monkeypox virus are shown on a patient's hand, from a 2003 case in the United States. In most instances, the disease causes fever and painful, pus-filled blisters. New cases in the United Kingdom, Spain and Portugal are spreading possibly through sexual contact, which had not previously been linked to monkeypox transmission. CDC/Getty Images hide caption

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CDC/Getty Images

Rare monkeypox outbreak in U.K., Europe and U.S.: What is it and should we worry?

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Dr. Jesse Clark is an infectious disease specialist at the University of California, Los Angeles. The COVID pandemic "has spurred people to try to end the HIV epidemic again," he says. Grace Widyatmadja/NPR hide caption

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Grace Widyatmadja/NPR

How COVID vaccines have boosted the development of an HIV vaccine

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One of the first clinical trials of a new mRNA vaccine for HIV is underway

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A woman wears a face shield to protect against COVID-19 at a taxi stand in Soweto, South Africa, where an omicron variant is causing a COVID-19 surge. Denis Farrell/AP hide caption

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Denis Farrell/AP

If you've had omicron before, are you safe from infection by the new variants?

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A case of COVID-19 brought 12-year-old Harry Nelson to the emergency room in Syracuse, N.Y., where cases are surging, His mother, photographer Paula Nelson, says he first had mild symptoms — just a headache — but later ran a high fever and began vomiting, which meant he couldn't keep down fever-relief meds. At the ER, he needed saline to rehydrate, Tylenol for his fever and meds to stop vomiting. Paula Nelson for NPR hide caption

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Paula Nelson for NPR

Rosy, 6, gives COVID tests and vaccines to her stuffed animals. She herself has been exposed to SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19, multiple times and never tested positive. What's her secret? Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR hide caption

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Michaeleen Doucleff/NPR

Why hasn't my daughter caught COVID? 2 factors likely protect her — and maybe you too

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