Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
Michaeleen Doucleff 2016 square
Stories By

Michaeleen Doucleff

Sanjit Das/NPR
Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Correspondent, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff, PhD, is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. For nearly a decade, she has been reporting for the radio and the web for NPR's global health outlet, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, cross-cultural parenting, and women and children's health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2019, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh produced a story about how Inuit parents teach children to control their anger. That story was the most popular one on NPR.org for the year; altogether readers have spent more than 16 years worth of time reading it.

In 2021, Doucleff published a book, called Hunt, Gather, Parent, stemming from her reporting at NPR. That book became a New York Times bestseller.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a bachelor degree in biology from Caltech, a doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

Story Archive

Monday

Saturday

Three years after COVID-19 started, scientists have learned valuable lessons

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1152313347/1152313348" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

12 月 7 日,一名老年人在中国重庆的一个临时接种点接种了新冠疫苗。对疫苗有效性和安全性的担忧导致人们不确定是否应该接种,尤其是对于疫苗接种率相对较低的老年人而言。 He Penglei/China News Service via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
He Penglei/China News Service via Getty Images

Monday

Encore: Do China's COVID vaccines do the job?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1146588153/1146588154" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

An older adult receives a COVID-19 vaccine at a temporary vaccination site on Dec. 7 in Chongqing, China. Concerns about effectiveness and safety have led to uncertainty about the COVID vaccine, notably among older citizens, whose vaccination rate is relatively low. He Penglei/China News Service via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
He Penglei/China News Service via Getty Images

China's COVID vaccines: Do the jabs do the job?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1143696652/1146494894" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Laura Gao for NPR

Can dogs smell time? Just ask Donut the dog

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139781319/1144942214" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friday

China is facing what could be the world's biggest COVID surge yet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1143640078/1143656856" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Thursday

Travelers at Shanghai Hongqiao Railway Station in Shanghai, China on Dec. 12. China's public health officials say up to 800 million people could be infected with the coronavirus over the next few months. Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Qilai Shen/Bloomberg via Getty Images

COVID spreading faster than ever in China. 800 million could be infected this winter

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1143002538/1143002539" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Protests raise questions about why China is still relying on COVID restrictions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139975988/1139975989" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

China is doing many millions of tests a day to uncover cases of COVID-19 — part of its zero-COVID policy. Above: People line up for nucleic acid tests to detect the virus at a public testing site on Nov. 17 in Beijing. Kevin Frayer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Kevin Frayer/Getty Images

Why China's 'zero COVID' policy is finally faltering

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1139848234/1139848235" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tuesday

Black Death survivors gave descendants a genetic advantage — but with a cost

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1136738671/1136738672" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wednesday

Researchers extracted DNA from the remains of people buried in the East Smithfield plague pits, which were used for mass burials in 1348 and 1349. Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) hide caption

toggle caption
Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA)

Black Death survivors gave their descendants a genetic advantage — but with a cost

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1129965424/1130032109" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Monday

Studies show that monkeypox isn't easy to catch from respiratory droplets or contaminated objects. It's one of the reasons that the virus hasn't spread more widely in the U.S. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Monkeypox cases in the U.S. are way down — can the virus be eliminated?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1129234501/1129247177" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tuesday

Monkeypox cases in the U.S. have been falling since a peak in early August

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1127959596/1127959597" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript