Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk.
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Michaeleen Doucleff

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Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Correspondent, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff, PhD, is a correspondent for NPR's Science Desk. For nearly a decade, she has been reporting for the radio and the web for NPR's global health outlet, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, cross-cultural parenting, and women and children's health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2019, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh produced a story about how Inuit parents teach children to control their anger. That story was the most popular one on NPR.org for the year; altogether readers have spent more than 16 years worth of time reading it.

In 2021, Doucleff published a book, called Hunt, Gather, Parent, stemming from her reporting at NPR. That book became a New York Times bestseller.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a bachelor degree in biology from Caltech, a doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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Illustration of antibodies (y-shaped) responding to an infection with the new coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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KATERYNA KON/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRA/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

How Long Does COVID Immunity Last Anyway?

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Are COVID-19 Vaccine Boosters Necessary?

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An illustration of a coronavirus particle and antibodies (depicted in blue). Christoph Burgstedt/Science Photo Library /Getty Images hide caption

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New Studies Find Evidence Of 'Superhuman' Immunity To COVID-19 In Some Individuals

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Months After The Vaccine, Your Antibodies May Actually Fight COVID Better

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Immunity To COVID-19 Could Last Longer Than You'd Think

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The number of people that one sick person will infect (on average) is called R0. Here are the maximum R0 values for a few viruses. NPR hide caption

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The Delta Variant Isn't As Contagious As Chickenpox. But It's Still Highly Contagious

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Vaccinated People Can Spread The Delta Variant, CDC Research Indicates

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Delta Variant Grows Rapidly Inside A Person's Respiratory Tract, Study Says

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New Data Leads To Rethinking (Once More) Where The Pandemic Actually Began

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New Analysis Reveals Fresh Clues About The Origins Of COVID-19

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The numerals in this illustration show the main mutation sites of the delta variant of the coronavirus, which is likely the most contagious version. Here, the virus's spike protein (red) binds to a receptor on a human cell (blue). Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

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Juan Gaertner/Science Source

Awe Appears To Be Awfully Beneficial

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Stuck In A Rut? Sometimes Joy Takes A Little Practice

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