Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk.
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Michaeleen Doucleff

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Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Reporter, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk. She reports for the radio and the Web for NPR's global health and development blog, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, drug development, and trends in global health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2015, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh reported on the extreme prejudices faced by young women in Nepal when they're menstruating. Their story was the second most popular one on the NPR website in 2015 and contributed to the NPR series on 15-year-old girls around the world, which won two Gracie Awards.

As a science journalist, Doucleff has reported on a broad range of topics, from vaccination fears and the microbiome to beer biophysics and dog psychology.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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Developed Countries Plan To Start Vaccination Soon. What About The Rest Of The World?

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A female Aedes aegypti mosquito feeds on human skin. James Gathany/CDC/Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images hide caption

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James Gathany/CDC/Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

The pharmaceutical company Pfizer, and its partner BioNTech said their experimental vaccine against COVID-19 appears to work — and work quite well. Matt Stone/MediaNews Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Stone/MediaNews Group via Getty Images

Why Poorer Countries Aren't Likely To Get The Pfizer Vaccine Any Time Soon

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Pollution is a global problem. Above: Stockton Street in the Chinatown district of San Francisco on Sept. 9, a time when air quality was affected by wind and wildfires. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Scientists Consider How Air Travelers Can Lessen Their COVID-19 Risk

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The nasal spray version of the flu vaccine contains live but weakened form of the virus. Researchers think there's a good chance this could help boost the body's immunity and improve its ability to fight off pathogens such as the coronavirus. Tim Sloan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Sloan/AFP via Getty Images

Scientists Experiment With TB Vaccine To See If It Slows Spread Of COVID-19

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Varham Muradyan for NPR

Are There Zombie Viruses — Like The 1918 Flu — Thawing In The Permafrost?

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Taking care of a newborn can be relentless and at some point, many parents need the baby to sleep — alone and quietly — for a few hours. So what does science say about the controversial practice of sleep training? Scott Bakal for NPR hide caption

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Scott Bakal for NPR

Sleep Training Truths: What Science Can (And Can't) Tell Us About Crying It Out

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A nurse administers the rotavirus vaccine, given during the first year of a baby's life. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

It Looked As Though Millions Of Babies Would Miss Out On A Lifesaving Vaccine

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