Michaeleen Doucleff Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk.
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Michaeleen Doucleff

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Michaeleen Doucleff 2016
Sanjit Das/NPR

Michaeleen Doucleff

Reporter, Science Desk

Michaeleen Doucleff is a reporter for NPR's Science Desk. She reports for the radio and the Web for NPR's global health and development blog, Goats and Soda. Doucleff focuses on disease outbreaks, drug development, and trends in global health.

In 2014, Doucleff was part of the team that earned a George Foster Peabody award for its coverage of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. For the series, Doucleff reported on how the epidemic ravaged maternal health and how the virus spreads through the air. In 2015, Doucleff and Senior Producer Jane Greenhalgh reported on the extreme prejudices faced by young women in Nepal when they're menstruating. Their story was the second most popular one on the NPR website in 2015 and contributed to the NPR series on 15-year-old girls around the world, which won two Gracie Awards.

As a science journalist, Doucleff has reported on a broad range of topics, from vaccination fears and the microbiome to beer biophysics and dog psychology.

Before coming to NPR in 2012, Doucleff was an editor at the journal Cell, where she wrote about the science behind pop culture. Doucleff has a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Berkeley, California, and a master's degree in viticulture and enology from the University of California, Davis.

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A nurse administers the rotavirus vaccine, given during the first year of a baby's life. Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Hector Retamal/AFP/Getty Images

It Looked As Though Millions Of Babies Would Miss Out On A Lifesaving Vaccine

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At a Feb. 21, 2018, Philippine Senate hearing in Manila on deaths linked to the dengue vaccine, families brought photos of children who had been vaccinated. Noel Celis /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rush To Produce, Sell Vaccine Put Kids In Philippines At Risk

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Dengue Vaccine Controversy In The Philippines

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World's First Malaria Vaccine Launches In Sub-Saharan Africa

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Health Officials Warn The Measles Outbreak Is Accelerating

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A nurse prepares the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in Haverstraw, N.Y. Several measles outbreaks in New York state are contributing to this year's unusually high measles rates. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Measles Outbreak 'Accelerates,' Health Officials Warn

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Teaching Kids To Control Their Anger

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Storytelling Instead Of Scolding: Inuit Say It Makes Their Children More Cool-Headed

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To tame your anger, it may help to take time to observe and name it. Ariel Davis for NPR hide caption

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Ariel Davis for NPR

Got Anger? Try Naming It To Tame It

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